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Publisher's Summary

Isaac's Storm meets The Age of Wonder in Lee Sandlin's Storm Kings, a riveting tale of the weather's most vicious monster - the super cell tornado - that recreates the origins of meteorology, and the quirky, pioneering, weather-obsessed scientists who helped change America.
©2013 Lee Sandlin (P)2013 Recorded Books
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Leslye Sinn on 10-23-16

American Meteorological History at its best

I really enjoyed this book, which traces the development of understanding of tornados from the settlement of America through the invention of the Enhanced Fujita Scale. I 'm a self-proclaimed weather geek, who watches storm chasers' live streams in the spring, and hurricanes in the fall. Over the last year, I've listened to several books on major disasters and meteorologists, including 2 on the Galveston hurricane and one on Moore, OK tornadoes and the OK City weathermen. This book filled in a large amount of background of the development of US meteorology in general and of some of the huge personalities and conflicts involved. The author does an excellent job of keeping the story moving, weaving together historical detail and scientific theories. I enjoyed how he developed each major figure's personality, including their eccentricities. There are quite detailed descriptions of horrific tragedies, so this is not for the squeamish, but all important in context of learning about killer storms. The narrator was quite excellent; he let the story shine through and I never had to give him a thought - which is what I consider ideal for most non-fiction books. I would highly recommend this book for anyone who has more than a passing interest in meteorology, tornadoes, and the long path to scientific understanding and forecasting.

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