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Publisher's Summary

The American Revolution was a home-front war that brought scarcity, bloodshed, and danger into the life of every American, and Carol Berkin shows us that women played a vital role throughout the struggle.
Berkin takes us into the ordinary moments of extraordinary lives. We see women boycotting British goods in the years before independence, writing propaganda that radicalized their neighbors, raising funds for the army, and helping finance the fledgling government. We see how they managed farms, plantations, and businesses while their men went into battle, and how they served as nurses and cooks in the army camps, risked their lives seeking personal freedom from slavery, and served as spies, saboteurs, and warriors.
She introduces us to 16-year-old Sybil Ludington, who sped through the night to rouse the militiamen needed to defend Danbury, Connecticut; to Phillis Wheatley, literary prodigy and Boston slave who voiced the hopes of African Americans in poems; to Margaret Corbin, crippled for life when she took her husband's place beside a cannon at Fort Monmouth; to the women who gathered firewood, cooked, cleaned for the troops, nursed the wounded, and risked their lives carrying intelligence and participating in reconnaissance missions. Here, too, are Abigail Adams, Deborah Franklin, Lucy Knox, and Martha Washington, who lived with the daily knowledge that their husbands would be hanged as traitors if the revolution did not succeed.
©2005 Carol Berkin (P)2018 Tantor
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Critic Reviews

"Berkin vividly recounts Colonial women's struggles for independence - for their nation and, sometimes, for themselves.... [Her] lively book reclaims a vital part of our political legacy." (Los Angeles Times Book Review)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Eric on 08-09-18

Required reading for American patriots.

That the accounts detailed in this book aren't better known is a national tragedy. While reading this book I felt both awe at the events described as well as bitterness because I hadn't heard them before. I almost certainly will listen to this book again.

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