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Publisher's Summary

Gone to Texas engagingly tells the story of the Lone Star State, from the arrival of humans in the Panhandle more than 10,000 years ago to the opening of the 21st Century. Focusing on the state's successive waves of immigrants, the audiobook offers an inclusive view of the vast array of Texans who, often in conflict with each other and always in a struggle with the land, created a history and an idea of Texas.
©2003 Randolph B. Campbell (P)2013 Audible, Inc.
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Jim In Texas! on 03-24-14

Good history from year zero through about 1962

Would you listen to Gone to Texas again? Why?

GTT has a lot of specific election and demographic data about Texas, it is a good reference for that sort thing.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Gone to Texas?

The early history of Texas and the details about the various Texas Native American tribes.

Any additional comments?

The author is clearly a liberal Democrat. That's fine for most of the book, but it distorts his telling of the history of post WWII Texas.<br/><br/>To give you one example, he connects Lee Harvey Oswald with vague 'conservative groups'. He never mentions that Oswald was literally a card carrying Communist.<br/><br/>The narrator has an excellent reading voice, but he was let down by an incompetent producer. Sommer has no idea how to pronounce the many Tejano based personal and place names we use in Texas.<br/><br/>It took me a while to figure out who this 'Juan Sagwin' person was for example. I'd never heard of 'U-va-lee' Texas, which is really pronounced 'U-vall-dee'. Many names and place names are mangled this way. <br/><br/>It's the job of the audio book producer to catch these kinds of mistakes, not the narrator. <br/>

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14 of 14 people found this review helpful


By Cindy on 11-12-15

Texas nationalism

Good understanding of Texas. listened to it three times for my history class. made life so much easier.

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5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By JohnWK on 06-17-17

Get to The Alamo!

Any additional comments?

Ironically, rather like Texas, this book is very large and very dry!<br/><br/>The narration style doesn't really help, to be honest, as it is somewhat monotonous.<br/><br/>I try to see books through to the end but, being honest, I am struggling with this one. If I do and my views change then I will write an addendum review. However I am struggling at present and find myself continuously saying "Oh just hurry up and get to The Alamo!".

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