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Publisher's Summary

Alexis de Tocqueville, a young French aristocrat, captured the essence of nineteenth-century America in his penetrating work, Democracy in America. The democratic concept of equality was emerging as a political reality in America, and it threatened the aristocracy of Europe; it produced a society of individualists hungry for self improvement. In this classic treatise, Tocqueville weighed the advantages of democracy against its dangers. He asked: Is the tendency toward equality a tendency toward liberty? Can the majority be restrained to protect the freedom of individuals and minorities? In pondering these questions, Tocqueville presented an unsurpassed picture of American government, culture, and attitudes. He proclaimed a new nation with a new theory of human interaction: America, ruled by the will of the majority.
(P)1987 Carmichael & Carmichael, Inc.
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
3 out of 5 stars
By rubic on 09-01-06

Not bad, not great

I thought that this would be a full reading of the actual book, since the title read "unabridged". However, it turned out to be a spoon-fed narration of the major points of the book. I did not mind the corny French accents that were used whenever Tocqueville or other French individuals were supposed to be speaking, but I found them unneccessary and somewhat annoying. Overall, I give the title 3 stars, but it's hardly an "unabridged" reading of the book.

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11 of 11 people found this review helpful

1 out of 5 stars
By Foolhardy on 02-17-08

Disappointed

It looks like the general consensus is disappointment so far. I also mistook this for the real deal and I think it is somewhat misrepresented in the description.

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7 of 7 people found this review helpful

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