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Publisher's Summary

For 400 years - from the first Spanish assaults against the Arawak people of Hispaniola in the 1490s to the US Army's massacre of Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in the 1890s - the indigenous inhabitants of North and South America endured an unending firestorm of violence. During that time the native population of the Western Hemisphere declined by as many as 100 million people.
Indeed, as historian David E. Stannard argues in this stunning new book, the European and white American destruction of the native peoples of the Americas was the most massive act of genocide in the history of the world.
Stannard reveals that wherever Europeans or white Americans went, the native people were caught between imported plagues and barbarous atrocities, typically resulting in the annihilation of 95 percent of their populations. What kind of people, he asks, do such horrendous things to others? His highly provocative answer: Christians. Digging deeply into ancient European and Christian attitudes toward sex, race, and war, he finds the cultural ground well prepared by the end of the Middle Ages for the centuries-long genocide campaign that Europeans and their descendants launched - and in places continue to wage - against the New World's original inhabitants.
©1992 David E. Stannard (P)2017 Tantor
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Critic Reviews

"Carefully researched, [and] well-written...A provocative account for public and academic libraries." ( Library Journal)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Robert Bourque on 03-16-18

Most important book I never heard of

What did you love best about American Holocaust?

This book gives a graphic history of the horrors visited upon Native Americans by the Europeans, especially the Spanish. It has been sugarcoated in our revisionist history books.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By William Weist on 03-09-18

Required

If you breathe air you need to read this. Words like genocide and Holocaust are not typically associated with American history, this book tells a different story.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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