Regular price: $24.49

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free.
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price.
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love.
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
Select or Add a new payment method

Buy Now with 1 Credit

By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Buy Now for $24.49

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Add to Library for $0.00

By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Bao Ninh, a former North Vietnamese soldier, provides a strikingly honest look at how the Vietnam War forever changed his life, his country, and the people who live there. Originally published against government wishes in Vietnam because of its nonheroic, nonideological tone, The Sorrow of War has won worldwide acclaim and become an international best seller.
©1991 Bao Ninh (P)2015 Tantor
Show More Show Less

Critic Reviews

"An unputdownable novel. It should win the Pulitzer Prize." ( The Guardian)
Show More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Joe R. on 05-13-18

My dead former enemy was speaking to me!

In May,1968, I was a 22 year old Marine infantry platoon commander. After one particular firefight I was searching the pockets of a dead NVA soldier looking for items of intelligence value like a diary. In the pockets of this one soldier I found a diary, a fountain pen, and then a photo which took my breath away. It showed him with his wife and two little kids, all smiling happily. I looked back at his expressionless face and, in my mind, spoke to him, saying,”I’m sorry you had to die today. Neither of us wanted to be here. I too have a wife and hope someday to have children like you.” Then the awfulness of the war washed over me. I’ve thought often about that brave former enemy. When I read “The Sorrow of War” I felt that it was him finally answering me, especially in this one passage:
“...he knew it wasn’t true that young Vietnamese loved war. Not true at all. If war came they would fight, and fight courageously. But that didn’t mean they loved fighting.
No. The ones who loved war were not the young men but the others like the politicians, middle-aged men with fat bellies and short legs. Not the ordinary people. The recent years of war had brought them enough suffering and pain to last them a thousand years.”
This book brought me a great deal of peace. I visited Vietnam a year ago. I wished I could bring my former foe back to life so we could be friends. That wish too is part of the sorrow of war.

Read More Hide me

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By wunderbuddy on 07-06-16

An amazing book. I have read so many books from another perspective and this one blew my mind.

This book is in the same league as All Quiet on the Western Front and even Forgotten Soldier. It was a far more coherent version of The things we carried and the prose if this book kept me glued to every word. A real classic.

Read More Hide me

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

See all Reviews