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Publisher's Summary

The fifth book in the hugely successful Earth's Children series.
Ayla and Jondalar have reached home: the Ninth Cave of the Zelandonii, the old stone age settlement in the region known today as south-west France. Ayla has much to learn from the Zelandonii as well as much to teach them. Jondalar's family are initially wary of the beautiful young woman he has brought back, with her strange accent and her tame wolf and horses. She is delighted when she meets Zelandoni, the spiritual leader of her people, a fellow healer with whom she can share her medicinal skills.
After the rigours and dangers that have characterised her extraordinary life, Ayla yearns for peace and tranquillity; to be Jondalar's mate and to have children. But her unique spiritual gifts cannot be ignored, and even as she gives birth to their eagerly-awaited child, she is coming to accept that she has a greater role to play in the destiny of the Zelandonii.
©2002 Jean M. Auel (P)2004 AudioGO Ltd
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Jessica on 12-08-13

I liked it but...

I was very disappointed in Rowena for changing her pronounciation of Zelandonii. In Valley of the Horses, it was established that it was pronounced Zelandonyee, but in this book (where it's repeated a hundred times!) she changes it to Zelandonee-eye. Soooo frustrating. There were a few other things that got on my nerves: The River she pronounces as Thee River, more often than not. I think this is more an error on Jean's part, though. It is extremely distracting and very unnecessary. This is the last book I care for in the series. The final book is not to my taste at all and I have no desire to purchase the audible version, having already read the printed version.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars
By marie on 06-29-17

Mediocre

Well.. I've been binge listening to these books for some months now and I love the first two. But the 3rd and this was rather mediocre. A lot of repetition and not much really happening. If I had something else in mind to read I'd end the series here as I don't expect the next one to be any better. But I don't have anything else in mind and it's grown into a routine so why not just finish it..? mixed feelings about this one and at times my thoughts wandered some were else as the book didn't really catch my attention as much as I'd preferred. Don't get me wrong; I love the world and the personalities, and I'll use my credit to give the last book a chance.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Sandy Suds on 07-20-15

Timeless

Would you listen to The Shelters of Stone again? Why?

I could listen to this story so many times. Having already read it, but now finding reading difficult due to failing eyesight, I have rediscovered these old friends anew and am delighting in the pleasure of the stories.

What other book might you compare The Shelters of Stone to, and why?

In my view there is no other book which can compare with this. The whole Clan of the Cave Bear Saga is a one-off and is so delightful in its development in the life of the young woman, Ayla.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

My favourite scene was when Ayla and Jondalar finally reached the land of the Zelandoni and she met Jondalar's family, at long last becoming a respected person in her own right.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

I could not stop listening to this, and unfortunately fell asleep on several occasions so that I had to rewind. In order to rectify this, I resorted to listening while in the bath - a most leisurely and much recommended way to have a long soak in a bath.

Any additional comments?

One of the best series of stories to have been produced in the modern day.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars
By LivingTheDream on 04-14-18

Getting repetitive

Having read all of the previous books this seems like a natural place to end Aylas story. Reviews for the next book are not good.

The story is still enticing but without the same level of intrigue created in previous books. There was a certain sense of inevitability which meant no real surprises. I felt more like I was going through the motions having devoted so much time to this story. Still worth a listen but unlikely I will continue to book 7.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
3 out of 5 stars
By Anonymous User on 06-03-18

Very repetitive but enjoyable

I was a little put off by some of the reviews on this book but having come so far with with Ayla and Jondalar I could not, in all good conscience, desert them now. The book is rather repetitive and I think Auel was so so impressed with her Mother Earth poem that she had to repeat it as often as possible. But the 5th time it was killing me. I did enjoy the rather slow moving story and will certainly finish out the series regardless of the poor reviews on the next book. Those that have come so far with these characters will have little problem continuing with their story. Happy Reading!

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4 out of 5 stars
By Amazon Customer on 05-11-18

laborious and lacking focus

there are so many good elements to Auel's writing. But the repeated references to paedophilia are hard to listen to. I think that Auel's publishers should have edited out these awful passages. What were they thinking? I cannot believe that the books have not been criticised for this. The idea of adults wanting to 'initiate' children into sexual "pleasures" might have been acceptable in some deviant circles in the 1960s, bit it is not acceptable today. such ideas should not be promulgated by the author, or publishers of these novels. Its a shame, because there are so many other, positive elements to these novels. In this novel, Auel begins clumsily and the characters are quite 'simpsonesque'. But she recovers and after the initial chapters, I was drawn back into the story. Roweena Cooper is a good narrator and manages to keep up the same level of interest despite the frequent, laborious passages where Auel has simply pasted her research notes into the novel. Such plumping is just uneccesary. careful and sensitive editing would have really helped Auel to tell her story more effectively. I wonder if she resisted editing? Such a shame. It is so rare to read an epic story with a female central character, and Auel's story could be so significant. But the paedophilia is hard to read. I would suggest that these books are either highly restricted or carefully edited before being reprinted.

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