The Last King of Scotland

  • by Giles Foden
  • Narrated by Mirron E. Willis
  • 13 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

Shortly after his arrival in Uganda, Scottish doctor Nicholas Garrigan is called to the scene of a bizarre accident: Idi Amin, careening down a dirt road in his Maserati, has hit a cow. When Garrigan tends to Amin, the dictator, obsessed with all things Scottish, appoints him as his personal physician. So begins a fateful dalliance with the African leader whose Emperor Jones-style autocracy would transform into a reign of terror. In The Last King of Scotland, Foden's Amin is as ridiculous as he is abhorrent: a self-proclaimed cannibal who, at the end of his eight years in power, would be responsible for 300,000 deaths. As Garrigan awakens to his patient's barbarism and his own complicity in it, we enter a venturesome meditation on conscience, charisma, and the slow corruption of the human heart.


What the Critics Say

"An affecting, chilling historical novel." (New York)
"Lurid and delightful, written with wit and real maturity." (Kirkus Reviews)
"A sobering reality check and an impressive work of fiction." (Washington Times)


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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

Worst Production Ever

A sometimes interesting story (although not frequently enough), in parts well written, but a significant audio challenge because a) the story often lapses into long stretches of narrative that are about as interesting as a technical manual but less artfully composed and b) the most interesting character, Amin, only makes intermittent appearances, while the least compelling character is the always present narrator. So how well has the producer responded to the challenge? Not at all--a complete and utter failure. The first mistake was the decision to try having all the characters read in accent. The second and most profound mistake was hiring an actor for the reading who is incapable of doing accents. Listening to this narration and ALL of the wrong notes struck by the reader would be like sitting through a 12 hour opera peformed entirely off key. You would want to puncture your own ear drums. Seriously, how could the producer have listened to the first 10 minutes of this narration and decided to continue on with this reader? The only thing that makes Mr. Willis's horribly wrong Scottish accent bearable is the fact that you are being spared from hearing him butcher a Ugandan, or worst of all, Israeli, accent. Adding insult to insult are the pathetic production standards that subject you to the narrator's annoying dry mouth sounds throughout most of the reading, as well as the frequent sounds of page turns in the background. If you are interested in this book, read it, but by all means skip this audio narration.
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- James

Worth the listen

After reading all the reviews, I decided to go ahead anyway and am glad i did. the book is a very good compliment to the movie and the french documentary on Idi Amin Dada -- lots of raw footage of him in the 70s. I did not find the accents distracting, but instead well done (except for the israli character). The book itself is well written, admittedly, perhaps, could have used some editing, especially in the last 2 hours, but I enjoyed and would recommend to those who have and have not seen the movie.
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- Nancy

Book Details

  • Release Date: 12-05-2006
  • Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.