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Publisher's Summary

The second novel in The Raj Quartet: the arrest by British police of Mohammed Ali Kasim, who is known to sympathise with the Quit India movement, signifies a further deterioration in Anglo-India relations.
For families such as the Laytons, who have lived and served in India for generations, the immediate social and political realities are both disturbing and tragic. With growing confusion and bewilderment, the British are forced to confront the violent and often brutal years that lie ahead.
©2010 Paul Scott (P)2010 Random House
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Critic Reviews

“Quite simply, monumental.” (The Washington Post)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Timothy on 12-10-12

Timeless classic, disastrous narrator choice

Paul Scott's Raj Quartet series is a timeless classic about the British rule in India and its ignominious end. I enjoyed listening to the first volume so much that I bought the second without listening to a sample. Big mistake.

I have experienced my share of poor narrators on Audible but never ever anything as bad as this. The problem is not the narrator's ability but his voice, and the emotion it conveys. No matter what the narrator is saying, he always sounds snotty, arrogant and condescending. Even the most simple, factual sentences sound like scathing insults. What is even worse for this book is the fact that this narrator's voice is the epitome of everything that Paul Scott criticizes about the British rule in India. It is the voice of the narrow-minded, pig-headed, racist British upper class who despise everything and everyone that does not belong to their tiny elite club. It is the exact opposite of everything for which Paul Scott's wonderful work stands and speaks out. It is like having a production of the Diary of Anne Frank narrated by the voice of a German World War II radio newscaster.

Choosing Richard Brown to narrate this book is probably the most egregiously inappropriate decision in the entire history of audio book publishing. He manages to completely destroy it and its message.

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6 of 6 people found this review helpful


By Everard (Desert Islander) on 03-02-17

It gets better!

Richard Brown's narration took some getting used to, I have been so taken with Sam Dastor"s rendition of Jewel in the Crown. However, I'm very glad to have persevered because this book gets better and better. It's not just a story, but also an insight into the latter days of the British Raj. This book is well worth listening to. Now onto #3.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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