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Publisher's Summary

Winner of the Arthur C. Clarke Award 2015
Day one: The Georgia Flu explodes over the surface of the Earth like a neutron bomb. News reports put the mortality rate at over 99%.
Week Two: Civilization has crumbled.
Year Twenty: A band of actors and musicians called the Travelling Symphony move through their territories performing concerts and Shakespeare to the settlements that have grown up there. Twenty years after the pandemic, life feels relatively safe. But now a new danger looms, and it threatens the hopeful world every survivor has tried to rebuild.
Moving backwards and forwards in time, from the glittering years just before the collapse to the strange and altered world that exists twenty years after, Station Eleven charts the unexpected twists of fate that connect six people: famous actor Arthur Leander; Jeevan, a bystander warned about the flu just in time; Arthur's first wife, Miranda; Arthur's oldest friend, Clark; Kirsten, an actress with the Travelling Symphony; and the mysterious and self-proclaimed 'prophet'.

Emily St. John Mandel was born in Canada and studied dance at The School of Toronto Dance Theatre. She is the author of the novels Last Night in Montreal, The Singer's Gun, The Lola Quartet, and Station Eleven and is a staff writer for The Millions. She is married and lives in New York.
©2014 Emily St. John Mandel (P)2014 Audible Studios
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Naomi on 04-03-16

Loved it

If you could sum up Station Eleven in three words, what would they be?

Compelling and thought provoking

Any additional comments?

I really enjoyed it and will probably listen again at some stage.

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2 out of 5 stars
By Jonathan on 01-19-15

Dullest apocalypse ever

Nothing new here from post outbreak reimaginings of recent films. I'm disappointed with this esp as it made top ten lists of 2014.

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Customer Reviews

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5 out of 5 stars
By Rosalynde on 07-20-15

Not just another dystopian novel

Would you listen to Station Eleven again? Why?

Yes. It was well narrated and very well written.

What other book might you compare Station Eleven to, and why?

The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell. Perhaps because I read them back to back but it's another novel that transcends the genre by being character driven, therefore appeals to people who may not be fans of science fiction.

Any additional comments?

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel

Although the premise is a dystopian science fiction novel, Station Eleven is a character driven plot. The book switches back and forth between several narrators, both before and after society crumbles due to the onset of a massive flu epidemic. The characters’ lives all intertwine in some way or another, some straight away, others not until the climax of the book, but all their lives seem to have been affected by the movie star Arthur Leander, whose death marks the beginning of each of their journeys. The dystopian element of the book provides a background upon which each individual is shaped, rather than being the driving force of the plot, so if you’re not a fan of science fiction or dystopia, it really doesn’t matter because this is a book about people and how their lives interconnect in a world without modern connections.

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5 of 6 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Norma Miles on 09-09-15

A life, remembered, is a series of photographs....

It all starts with a single death, that of an aging, but much revered, actor, on stage during his performance of King Lear.it was a stroke or heart attack - natural causes, anyway. But behind the scenes a pandemic is growing, within weeks weeping away almost the entire population of the world. We are spared the gruesome telling of the deaths. Instead, the author weaves an intricate tapestry of lives before and after the depopulation event of people who at some point touched that of the actor, some intimately and others for only a few moments.
This is an apocalyptic story like no other I have read. No zombies for a start. And almost without the graphic scenes of violence such a book would leave us to expect. Instead it is full of tensions, excitement, memories, friendships and fears of losing ones much loved. Of survival, too, and of hopes, dreams and a comic book. Because survival alone is not enough.
This is a book which makes us aware of what we have and what could all be lost, what we value most, what we leave undone. And how, even in the worst of situations not only can still more be taken away but that there is also hope and comfort in the little things so easily overlooked in this, our present world of plenty.

A wonderful book, beautifully written, skilfully crafted and achingly memorable, all perfectly narrated by Jack Hawkins. As with the novel, I cannot praise his performance more highly.

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17 of 23 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By Denison on 06-02-15

Good book if you dont think about it too much

It focuses on the characters rather than the post apocalypse. It sets them up quite well, but the payoff isnt that great.

There are some things that dont make sense (lack of electricity for 20 years), but it can easily be ignored.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

2 out of 5 stars
By Scott J Redpath on 07-09-18

disappointing

First, it was near impossible to get past the narration. voice actor uses same inflection for all women and children, making them sound like they have a brain disorder. Broke immersion of the book everytime.
As for the story, it hints at something interesting but ultimately missed the mark. there are so many characters and the time line changes so much it's difficult to keep track of what's relevant. I also found the main protagonist very anti climatic. Hints at an interesting world with an underlying message i just couldn't get interested in.

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