• Poe's Children

  • The New Horror: An Anthology (Unabridged Selections)
  • By: Peter Straub
  • Narrated by: Various
  • Length: 15 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Release date: 10-14-08
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Random House Audio
  • 3 out of 5 stars 2.9 (30 ratings)

Regular price: $46.60

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Publisher's Summary

From the incomparable master of horror and suspense comes an electrifying collection of contemporary literary horror, with stories from 25 writers representing today's most talented voices in the genre.Horror writing is usually associated with formulaic gore, but New Wave horror writers have more in common with the wildly inventive, evocative spookiness of Edgar Allan Poe than with the sometimes predictable hallmarks of their peers. Showcasing this cutting-edge talent, Poe's Children now brings the best of the genre's stories to a wider audience. Featuring tales from such writers as Neil Gaiman and Jonathan Carroll, Poe's Children is Peter Straub's tribute to the imaginative power of storytelling. Each previously published story has been selected by Straub to represent what he thinks is the most interesting development in our literature during the last two decades.Selections range from the early Stephen King psychological thriller "The Ballad of the Flexible Bullet," in which an editor confronts an author's belief that his typewriter is inhabited by supernatural creatures, to "The Man on the Ceiling," Melanie and Steve Rasnic Tem's award-winning surreal tale of night terrors, woven with daylight fears that haunt a family. Other selections include National Book Award finalist Dan Chaon's "The Bees"; Peter Straub's "Little Red's Tango," the legend of a music aficionado whose past is as mysterious as the ghostly visitors to his Manhattan apartment; Elizabeth Hand's visionary and shocking "Cleopatra Brimstone"; Thomas Ligotti's brilliant, mind-stretching "Notes on the Writing of Horror: A Story"; and "Body," Brian Evenson's disturbing twist on correctional facilities.Crossing boundaries and packed with imaginative chills, Poe's Children bears all the telltale signs of fearless, addictive fiction.
©2008 Peter Straub; ©2008 Random House Audio
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
1 out of 5 stars
By Rona M. Berkhouse on 07-21-14

STOP! READ REVIEWS 1ST!!!

What would have made Poe's Children better?

Stories that made sense and were actually scary instead of just tedious and weird

Has Poe's Children turned you off from other books in this genre?

NO

Would you be willing to try another one of Various’s performances?

YES

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Poe's Children?

Every story after the 1st. I felt like it was bait and switch

Any additional comments?

I will be returning this book. I tried several times to get into it. Skipped ahead and listened to several stories over a period a several weeks. I'm sorry to it was more of the same boring, weird stories that made absolutely no sense. If I could choose a (-) star to rate this I would

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3 of 3 people found this review helpful

1 out of 5 stars
By M. Rocheleau on 04-07-09

Couldn't Get Through It

Of all the stories I heard, the first one was the best. I didn't think it was great but it was decent and mildly unsettling. I listened to two more afterwards and both seemed endless and went nowhere. It was one of the rare times I desperately wished to be able to flip ahead and see how many more pages there were left to go. They weren't horror stories so much as bizarrely conceived expositions on the horror that is a part of us all and can take many forms and blah blah blah.. I hated it, but I also didn't finish it. Maybe some works of genius were hiding towards the end.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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