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Publisher's Summary

Some people have dreams that are so magnificent that if they were to achieve them, their place in history would be guaranteed. People like Christopher Columbus, Isaac Newton, Florence Nightingale, Thomas Edison, Nancy Astor, Charles Lindbergh, Amy Johnson, Edmund Hilary and Neil Armstrong - their unparalleled success has made their stories into legend.But what if one man had such a dream, and once he'd achieved it, there was no proof that he had fulfilled his ambition? Jeffrey Archer's new novel, Paths of Glory, is the story of such a man - George Mallory. Born in 1886, he was a brilliant student who became part of the Bloomsbury Group at Cambridge in the early twentieth century and served in the Royal Garrison Artillery during World War I. After the war, he married, had three children, and would have spent the rest of his life as a schoolteacher, but for his love of mountain climbing.
Mallory once told a reporter that he wanted to climb Mt. Everest, "because it is there." On his third try in 1924, at age 37, he was last seen 400 feet from the top. His body was found in 1999, and it remains a mystery whether he and his climbing partner, Andrew Irvine, ever reached the summit.
In fact, not until you've heard the last words of Archer's extraordinary novel will you be able to decide if George Mallory should be added to that list of legends, while another name would have to be removed. Paths of Glory is truly a triumph.
©2009 Jeffrety Archer (P)2009 Macmillan Audio
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Joel on 03-18-09

Archer Does it Again!

The first Archer book I read was The Prisoner of Birth, and I was instantly drawn into what for me is one of the best mysteries of all time. So of course when I heard Archer came out with another novel, I bought it on release day, and once again it doesn't disappoint.

Archer has this amazing way of telling a story, he slowly ramps your interest into the characters until you get to the point where your thinking about the book even when your not listening to it. I had never had much interest in climbing but after reading this book I have a whole new appreciation for their art form.

The book as a whole is brilliant, its part love story, part adventure, and a whole lot of twists and turns up until the last words. Although maybe not as earth shattering as The Prisoner of Birth, this book really deserves a look.

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27 of 28 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By deborah hill on 12-14-09

One Star? No way Jose.

I always wonder when I see a One Star rating against a bunch of Four-Five Stars what that person saw that the others did not. In this case it must have been the whole book because this story is terrific.

I'm a big Archer fan and count this among his best. It is a great story with classic characters and larger than life motives. It does have a bit of a 'Goodbye Mr. Chips' feel, but it is consistant with the period and settings.

In the end, I wonder if he made it.

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6 of 6 people found this review helpful

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