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Publisher's Summary

Absurdly logical, mercilessly real, gathering its own tumultuous momentum for the ultimate brush with commodity training, JR captures the listener in the cacophony of voices that revolves around this young captive of his own myths. The disturbing clarity with which this finished writer captures the ways in which we deal, dissemble, and stumble through our words - through our lives - while the real plans are being made elsewhere makes JR the extraordinary novel that it is.
©1975 William Gaddis (P)2010 Audible, Inc.
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Peregrine on 12-12-10

Possibly superior as an audio book

This is a sprawling, weird novel consisting almost entirely of dialogue. I usually follow audiobooks by leapfrogging with a paper copy which I read when I have time. This novel is actually easier to follow on audio, since Nick Sullivan does a very good job giving each character an idiosyncratic accent. On the page it can easily become just a sea of words.

As a novel it's certainly not for everyone, a withering critique of American capitalism told mostly through a little boy's farcical creation of a virtual financial empire made of leveraged purchases of bad businesses, with a frustrated writer and an aristocratic beauty the only ones who can see through it. It's also a bit of an historical artifact, giving us little bits of life in 1970's New York and Long Island. But it's a classic of 20th century American literature, sort of a cross between Ulysses and Doonesbury.

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17 of 18 people found this review helpful


By Brad on 08-31-10

An Audiobook Landmark

Nick Sullivan deserves an Audie Lifetime Achievement Award for this book alone. It is a genuine tour de force of voice acting--he probably plays over 200 different roles in the course of this challenging but entertaining novel, most of which is told in snatches of dialogue. He manages to be convincing as everyone from a New York dowager in her eighties to eight year-old boys and girls, as well as lawyers, doctors, teachers, cops, politicians, ad men, low lifes, members of high society, preachers and sinners, and dozens more. It's a long book, but I found Sullivan made it far easier to follow the story than I was ever able to when I tried to read the book. Bravo, Mr. Sullivan!

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15 of 16 people found this review helpful

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