Harvest Home

  • by Thomas Tryon
  • Narrated by Jonathan Yen
  • 16 hrs and 1 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

In a country village, a family of New Yorkers encounters a chilling ancient rite
After watching his asthmatic daughter suffer in the foul city air, Theodore Constantine decides to get back to the land. When he and his wife search New England for the perfect nineteenth-century home, they find no township more charming, no countryside more idyllic than the farming village of Cornwall Coombe. Here they begin a new life: simple, pure, close to nature - and ultimately more terrifying than Manhattan’s darkest alley.
When the Constantines win the friendship of the town matriarch, the mysterious Widow Fortune, they are invited to join the ancient festival of Harvest Home, a ceremony whose quaintness disguises dark intentions. In this bucolic hamlet, where bootleggers work by moonlight and all of the villagers seem to share the same last name, the past is more present than outsiders can fathom - and something far more sinister than the annual harvest is about to rise out of the earth.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

I'd give it half a star if I could.

Just watch "Children of the Corn". You'll save a lot of time and boredom. Meh.
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- Jon Deaux

more literate than horror and solid

this is billed as an "oh my god" horror novel but it is not like that at all I don't think. it is well done and a lot more in it than i remembered from having read it years ago. If you're familiar at all with Fowle's The Magus, the film the Wicker Man, fertility rites, Burnt Offerings, greek myth and Eleusinian mysteries you will pick up on what's going on early on and for that reason it didn't surprise me nor shock me.

I like it very much for all those reasons (tidbits of lore and history etc.) and i think it is well researched as far as that goes. Joseph Campbell deals with a lot of fertility rites etc that have some shocking elements and I think that Tryon's overall "reconstruction" of a society of that type is very well thought out.

I can't rank it as highly as The Other as i feel there are some moments that needed to be redrawn as they got a bit unbelievable or cliche, and i think that it meanders a bit along the way to it's goal, whereas the Other didn't feel like there was anything extraneous in it.

Overall I'm glad i revisited it and found many things in it that i'd totally forgotten and it is better than i remembered. A friend liked this one better than Other. I think that with a little more pace, it could make for an excellent film if someone like HBO took the time to do a little mini series and cover all the important detail.

(i do think the narrator was fine but a little lackluster, some moments needing more emotion in a character's voice than he gave)
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- Darryl

Book Details

  • Release Date: 10-28-2013
  • Publisher: Audible Studios