A Song of Africa: The Roots of Boko Haram

  • by Ronald B. Wheatley
  • Narrated by Rosemary Benson
  • 5 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

Amazon top 100
For African travel
For African history
For Nigeria

Thrill and Learn.
You need to listen to this audiobook if you want to understand the backdrop of history that created the fertile soil for today’s homegrown terrorist group-Boko Haram-to literally spring up overnight and within half a dozen years bring the most populous country in Africa to the greatest crisis in its history.
The story is told through the eyes of fortune seeking engineer Paul Jeffries-out to make millions on a state of the art telecommunications project in Nigeria-who must confront his own demons by agreeing to search for the American ambassador’s daughter, Maureen Cahill, who has fled the relative safety of the embassy in Lagos to the besieged and shrinking rebel enclave of Biafra to help refugees in the mid 1960’s civil war. The journey will take them both to the darkest and most dangerous mangrove infested corner of one of Africa’s bloodiest civil wars. The trek will test their commitment to aiding the country, their dreams for nation building, and their growing love for each other.
You need to hear this audible book if you want to have an insight on how the events taking place in Nigeria today are a microcosm of the turmoil taking place today across Africa and the Middle East.


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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

Ronald B. Wheatley delivers an engaging story

Would you consider the audio edition of A Song of Africa: The Roots of Boko Haram to be better than the print version?

The audio version enhances the print version -- brings an extra dimension to the story.

What was one of the most memorable moments of A Song of Africa: The Roots of Boko Haram?

The way Mr. Wheatley wove the many flashbacks throughout the narrative.

What does Rosemary Benson bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Her ability to interpret numerous characters is admirable -- especially in view of so many male characters.

Who was the most memorable character of A Song of Africa: The Roots of Boko Haram and why?

Maureen's fate easily makes her a sympathetic character. Her relation to Paul, of course, is a determining factor in her fate.

Any additional comments?

My first encounter with Ronald Wheatley's writing was his “Elusive Dreams,” an extensive internet posting about his Peace Corps and Vietnam War experiences. I was captivated by his ability to craft a story. Several years ago, Wheatley's “A Song of Africa” reinforced my estimation of his linguistic skills. Recently, I had the pleasure of listening to Rosemary Benson's audio version of the book. Over two days, I enjoyed her narration as the plot and sub-plots developed. Her “staging” of the numerous characters enhanced the delight I gained from a compelling story -- “A Song of Africa: The Roots of Boko Haram.”

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- Patrick G. Metoyer

Book Details

  • Release Date: 08-25-2014
  • Publisher: Law Offices of Ronald Wheatley