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Editorial Reviews

Why are many supposedly egalitarian Americans fascinated by the aristocratic privilege of Britain as displayed by Downton Abbey and the royal family? In this illuminating essay, cultural critic Mark Dery explores the attractions that Britain's literature, music, and style present for Americans. From a childhood fascination with the Wonder Books to an adolescent fixation on Jethro Tull and adulthood admiration for Christopher Hitchens, Dery’s take is highly personal, yet also displays larger societal insight. By turns savage and sympathetic, his prose is also wryly funny. Performer Mark Ashby does a good job capturing Dery's tone, and alternating between the British and American accents of the text.
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Publisher's Summary

Downton Abbey has brought out the Anglophile in American fans of the hit TV series. But Anglophilia has a long history in America. Why are some native-born residents of our Shining City Upon a Hill, where All Men Are Created Equal, seduced by the fluting tones of manor-born privilege? At last, Anglophilia explained - in American, thank you.
©2013 Mark Dery (P)2013 Audible, Inc.
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Emily on 02-23-14

Qualifies as my most irritating Audible purchase

This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

I guess people who think Anglophiles are snobbish, social climbing jerks might enjoy this book. Thankfully it was only 48 minutes long so I listened to the end. Certainly not what I expected.

Any additional comments?

If you love being an Anglophile then you can give this title a miss.

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4 of 4 people found this review helpful


By Laurie on 03-14-14

Not worth it, and it was free!

What would have made England My England better?

Maybe addressing reasons Americans find England and royalty interesting rather than just ramble about a Wonder Book the author read as a youth. Also, it became obvious the author disdains anyone who does have an interest in England and its history. I believe the author sought to impress his readership with his vocabulary and his "better than you" attitude rather than provide anything positive.

Would you ever listen to anything by Mark Dery again?

No way! He comes across as a pompous academic. I can't imagine him producing anything enlightening or entertaining after this short disaster.

What do you think the narrator could have done better?

Given the material, I think the narrator did about as well as possible.

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

Anger, definitely! We thought we would hear a lighthearted look as what makes Americans love the royals and England but it was just a slam to both England and to those who love it.

Any additional comments?

The book started out with a little bit of humor and we actually laughed out loud but the book steadily became irritating. We didn't finish it because it just wasn't worth putting up with the author's attitude. If we could give zero stars, that would have been the score.

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3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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