Regular price: $6.95

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free.
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price.
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love.
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
Select or Add a new payment method

Buy Now with 1 Credit

By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Buy Now for $6.95

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Add to Library for $0.00

By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Editorial Reviews

Population problems? Eat the babies, of course. That's what Irish writer Jonathan Swift purports in this famous collection of essays. Both humorous and significant, Swift's articles are some of the most memorable English satirical works. Fittingly so, Norman Dietz is a superb audio performer in a league of his own. His tone juxtaposes both the serious and the tongue-in-cheek, thus capturing Swift's intentions. For each essay, Dietz adopts a caricature appropriate to the context. These essays have been startling since the 1700s. When combined with Dietz's performance, they are enthralling, hilarious, and deeply moving.
Show More Show Less

Publisher's Summary

In "A Modest Proposal," first published in 1729, Jonathan Swift heaps scorn on then-current political theory and reveals the appalling suffering taking place in Ireland - not through direct reporting, but through mock suggestions on what to do with the poor; they should sell their children for food. "The chief end I propose to myself in all my labors is to vex the world rather than divert it," wrote Jonathan Swift in a letter to his friend Alexander Pope. Other vexing works collected here are "Directions to Servants," "The Art of Political Lying," "A Digression Concerning the Critics," and "Sweetness and Light."
Public Domain (P)1989 Recorded Books
Show More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Jaded Buddha on 11-28-12

Very good reading; subpar audio quality

Obviously this is a great story, a masterpiece of satirical humor. I am not reviewing the story. I just wanted to note that I thought the reading performance was very good. The audio quality is not so great, but I found it totally listenable and enjoyed it.

Read More Hide me

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

1 out of 5 stars
By Tacfarinas on 08-20-09

waste of money

As been said, this is very difficult to hear; it's the worst audio quality of anything I've ever got from audible.

On top of that, the reader (firmly American) reads without any of the drama and irony that might help to communicate the point of Swift's satire.

Doing these kinds of texts badly is a sadly wasted opportunity.

Read More Hide me

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

See all Reviews
© Copyright 1997 - 2018 Audible, Inc