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Editorial Reviews

Stevenson's most often dramatized and distorted novella gets its umpteenth audiobook narration from the talented Scott Brick. Although his British accent is a wee bit shaky, he doesn't disappoint. He narrates in his wonted American voice with particular attention to atmosphere and delivers his British characters with personality and a reserve that lends appropriate gravity to the tale and plays effectively against its melodrama.
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Publisher's Summary

When a brute of a man tramples an innocent girl, apparently out of spite, two bystanders catch the fellow and force him to pay reparations to the girl's family. The brute's name is Edward Hyde. A respected lawyer, Utterson, hears this story and begins to unravel the seemingly manic behavior of his best friend, Dr. Henry Jekyll, and his connection with Hyde. Several months earlier, Utterson had drawn up an inexplicable will for the doctor, naming Hyde as his heir in the event that he disappears. Fearing his friend has been blackmailed into this arrangement, Utterson probes deeper into both Jekyll and his unlikely protégé. He is increasingly unnerved at each new revelation.
In a forerunner of psychological dramas to come, Stevenson uses Hyde to show that we are both repulsed by and attracted to the darker side of life, particularly when we can experience it in anonymity.
©2002 Tantor Media, Inc.
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
3 out of 5 stars
By Jim "The Impatient" on 04-26-16

I SAW WHAT I SAW

I HEARD WHAT I HEARD
It was hard to keep my mind focused on this. This does not stand up to modern day horror. The many movies that have been made from this, some turning Mr. Hyde into Jack the Ripper, are good movies. If you listen to the last twenty minutes of this, you have the whole book in a nutshell. This book also hits two of my pet peeves. !. Evil people look evil, usually having a deformity and good people are pretty, handsome, tall, petite, etc... 2. Something is so terrible, the writer can't describe it. This was common practice of the time. I thought Brick was good.

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79 of 95 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Jessica on 08-26-15

excellent story superb reader

this is a story that I have always enjoyed, and Scott brick is incapable of a bad performance. this is a copy that I would highly recommend to anyone interested in this classic.

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13 of 16 people found this review helpful

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