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Publisher's Summary

Ralph Waldo Emerson was an American philosopher, lecturer, essayist, and poet, who is best remembered for leading the Transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was a a champion of individualism and wrote dozens of essays. Most criics consider "Self-Reliance" his best. It has the most thorough statement of one of Emerson's repeating themes, the need for each individual to avoid conformity and false consistency. It also emphasized the need to follow one's own instincts and ideas. "Self-Reliance" contains one of Emerson's most famous quotes: "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds."
Public Domain (P)2010 Jimcin Recordings
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By cindilla on 12-15-12

Wonderful

If you could sum up Self-Reliance in three words, what would they be?

Wonderful rendition of one of my favorite essays.

What was the most compelling aspect of this narrative?

Clear, concise, thoughtful

What about Jim Killavey’s performance did you like?

Did a great job.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

The whole thing

Any additional comments?

Intend to listen to "Civil Disobedience" next. Hope it's the same reader.

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6 of 6 people found this review helpful


By MiamiLitNerd on 09-28-16

Narrator didn't pronounce his Rs

I guess it's realistic because Emerson was a Bostonian, but it was really annoying that he said, for example, propahty instead of property. Really. It got annoying and hard to understand at times.
Text is obviously a classic of American literary thought.

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