Prometheus Bound

  • by Aeschylus
  • Narrated by Robin Field
  • 1 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

When a jealous Zeus discovers that the compassionate Titan, Prometheus, has introduced the gift of fire to liberate mere mortals from oppression and servitude, he has Prometheus bound to a rocky prison in the Scythian desert, where the god discloses the reason for his punishment.
Prometheus Bound is one of only seven surviving plays by the prolific Athenian playwright, Aeschylus. Born into a noble family in 525 BC, Aeschylus is credited with having introduced dialogue into the Greek drama, and indeed is a father of modern theater.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

A one-man show

Robin Field appears to be doing all the voices in this production. Given that, it's more dramatic than might be expected: he's acting out the play, not simply reading it. If Field were less skillful, it could be dismissed as a vanity production. But it doesn't quite work for me. I have two complaints: in a couple of scenes, the voices are close enough together that it's difficult to tell immediately who's speaking; and the translation Field uses is a very poor one, from the standpoint of English style: an early-twentieth-century imitation of "Bible English" taken from Harvard Classics. (Probably easy on the royalty department, but hard on the ears. Surely there are better public domain translations available.)
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- Tad "Shakespeare, Dickens, Homer, Mark Twain, Walt Disney, History."

A one-man show

Robin Field appears to be doing all the voices in this production. Given that, it's more dramatic than might be expected: he's acting out the play, not simply reading it. If Field were less skillful, it could be dismissed as a vanity production. But it doesn't quite work for me. I have two complaints: in a couple of scenes, the voices are close enough together that it's difficult to tell immediately who's speaking; and the translation Field uses is a very poor one, from the standpoint of English style: an early-twentieth-century imitation of "Bible English" taken from Harvard Classics. (Probably easy on the royalty department, but hard on the ears. Surely there are better public domain translations available.)
Read full review

- Tad Davis

Book Details

  • Release Date: 10-07-2010
  • Publisher: Mission Audio