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Publisher's Summary

Edith Nesbit is more famously known as a writer of children’s stories such as The Railway Children. But in this volume we explore her short stories of the macabre and ghostly sort. Born in 1858 in Kennington, then part of Surrey and now London, her early life was one of constant moving about until she met, at age 17, Hubert Bland whom she was to marry three years later – whilst she was seven months pregnant.
Thought of as the first modern writer for children she also wrote for adults producing over 50 books in total as well as collections of poetry which we shall explore in a separate volume. These stories are brought to your ears in eerie detail by Ghizela Rowe and Richard Mitchley.
©2012 The Copyright Group (P)2012 The Copyright Group
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Michael on 10-28-16

Scared my 11 year old

My own fault: I should have thought about it before letting her listen. The first story kept her up all night in a fully lit room. We found all the stories great, except for maybe the second one: the reader is always swallowing and making other mouth noises, and his reading is sort of ponderous. Otherwise, fantastic! Last one is a treat in the line of "The Open Window."

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