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Editorial Reviews

AudioFile Earphones Award winner William Roberts' distinctive voice creates a sense of authenticity to this O. Henry story set at the turn of the 20th century. A policeman chances upon a man standing in a doorway who tells him that 20 years ago, he and his friend had made a deal to meet at that spot at that particular date. True to O. Henry's signature writing style, there is more to this story than might be expected. Roberts' performance crackles with energy, and he paces the story expertly, allowing the final plot twist to coil and snap like a whip.
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Publisher's Summary

This is a story from the Classic American Short Stories collection.
Here are eight stories from master American writers of the 19th century. They vary from sinister tales by Ambrose Bierce - why is that window boarded up? - and a reflective moment in the life of a woman without children, but forced to look after children, to classic short stories by O. Henry and Stephen Crane. There is even an elegiac description of an eclipse by James Fenimore Cooper, author of The Last of the Mohicans. Read with sensitivity and skill by Garrick Hagon and Liza Ross.
Public Domain (P)2001 NAXOS AudioBooks Ltd.
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Gary on 03-21-16

Production Ruined

This is a classic story ruined by music placed under the narration at the end of the narration. The point of an O. Henry story is the twist at the end and not being able to hear it destroys it utterly.

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