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  • Why Everyone Owes Everyone and No One Can Pay
  • By: John Lanchester
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Iris
  • Length: 7 hrs
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Release date: 05-03-10
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Whole Story Audiobooks
  • 5 out of 5 stars 4.8 (12 ratings)

Regular price: $15.48

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Publisher's Summary

In 2000, the total GDP of Earth was $36 trillion. At the start of 2007, it was $70 trillion. Today that growth has gone suddenly and sharply into decline.
John Lanchester travels with a cast of characters - including reckless bankers, snoozing regulators, complacent politicians, predatory lenders, credit-drunk spendthrifts, and innocent bystanders, to understand deeply and genuinely what is happening and why we feel the way we do.
©2010 John Lanchester (P)2010 WF Howes Ltd
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Critic Reviews

"A valiant and genuinely amusing attempt to describe how finance came off the rails...written with a good heart and a lively intellectual curiosity. ( Independent)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Judy Corstjens on 09-05-13

Elegance and charm, jazzing on a well-known theme

I've read several books (Gillian Tett's Fools Gold, Michael Lewis's The Big Short, Gordon Brown's apology..) about the financial crisis, so I can't really say I learnt anything new from John Lanchester. However, I was richly amused and entertained by his whimsical and informal style. His wry wit and colloquial turn of phrase often had me laughing out loud. And it is a story so amazing, so profound and so ongoing (unfortunately) that it bears retelling a few times, in different registers, by different people. Mr Lanchester is a definite outsider. Son of an old fashioned (good/safe) banker, he read English and became a writer. He can take the 'man in the street' perspective, and uses analogies that make the whole episode both accessible and maximally absurd.

Normally I don't like narrators trying to mimic real characters (e.g. the voices of Ronald Reagan and Alan Greenspan), but in this context - a rather theatrical book - it does more or less work. The narrator also manages to personify Mr Lanchester's animated and humorous style.

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7 of 7 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Geraldine on 07-19-10

essential but witty

This book has tackled a diificult subject and made it interesting and accessible. The author is very knowledgeable but he puts over his knowledge in a very clear and witty way.
I have been telling all my friends about it and I hope it has a well deserved sucess

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3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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