The Self-Made Billionaire Effect

  • by John Sviokla, Mitch Cohen
  • Narrated by Erik Synnestvedt
  • 6 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

Imagine what Atari might have achieved if Steve Jobs had stayed there to develop the first massmarket personal computer. Or what Steve Case might have done for PepsiCo if he hadn't left for a gaming start-up that eventually became AOL. What if Salomon Brothers had kept Michael Bloomberg, or Bear Stearns had exploited the inventive ideas of Stephen Ross? Scores of top-tier entrepreneurs worked for established corporations before they struck out on their own and became self-made billionaires. People like Mark Cuban, John Paul DeJoria, Sara Blakely, and T. Boone Pickens all built businesses - in some cases, multiple businesses - that are among today's most iconic brands. This fact raises two profound questions: Why couldn't their former employers hang on to these extraordinarily talented people? And why are most big companies unable to create as much new value as the world's roughly 800 self-made billionaires?
John Sviokla and Mitch Cohen decided to look more closely at self-made billionaires because creating $1 billion or more in value is an incredible feat. Drawing on extensive research and interviews, the authors concluded that many of the myths perpetuated about billionaires are simply not true. These billionaires aren't necessarily smarter, harder working, or luckier than their peers. They aren't all prodigies, crossing the billionaire finish line in their 20s. Nor, most of the time, do they create something brand-new: More than 80 percent of the billionaires in the research sample earned their billions in highly competitive industries. The key difference is what the authors call the "Producer" mind-set, in contrast with the far more pervasive "Performer" mind-set. Performers strive to excel in well-defined areas, and are important. But Producers are critical to any company looking to create massive value because they redefine what’s possible, rather than simply meeting preexisting goals and standards.

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What the Critics Say

"The first billion is the hardest. I know from experience. If you are interested in giving it a shot, The Self-made Billionaire Effect is a good starting point. Great research. Great stories. Great opportunity." (T. Boone Pickens, Chairman, BP Capital Management)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

Great read for all entrepreneurs

This book really outlines what it takes to be a high producer and a high performer to reach the stage of billionaire status
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- Craig

Good message, lacks quality

It was a good book, and simply that. The idea of performer vs. producer is touched on over and over. Great examples and stories, but lacks quality information about becoming a producer. Not until the end does it get really into detail about producers and how to cultivate them. Interesting, but not a must buy.
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- Luke

Book Details

  • Release Date: 01-06-2015
  • Publisher: Gildan Media, LLC