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Publisher's Summary

This book builds on a simple premise: good teaching cannot be reduced to technique but is rooted in the identity and integrity of the teacher. Good teaching takes myriad forms but good teachers share one trait: they are authentically present in the classroom, in community with their students and their subject. They possess "a capacity for connectedness" and are able to weave a complex web of connections between themselves, their subjects, and their students, helping their students weave a world for themselves. Connections made by good teachers are held not in their methods but in their hearts - the place where intellect, emotion, spirit, and will converge in the human self - when we choose to live authentic lives.
©2007 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.; (P)2009 Blackstone Audio, Inc.
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Critic Reviews

"A profoundly moving, utterly passionate, and inspired articulation of the call to, and the pain and joy of, teaching. It is must reading for any and every teacher, at any level." (Jon Kabat-Zinn, author of Wherever You Go, There You Are)
"Evokes the heart of what teachers really do, and does so in a vivid, compelling, and soulful way." (Robert Coles, Harvard University)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Alan on 07-17-11

Food for Thought

I enjoyed this book. Palmer has lots of ideas and the book is kind of a reflective work on his career. The book ends with a call to action but fortunately it is relatively short. I like most of his ideas and will listen to this book again. Palmer gives a lot of food for thought and is easy to listen to, excellent narration.

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3 of 3 people found this review helpful


By M. Meyers on 10-12-13

Great content. Annoying performance

Is there anything you would change about this book?

I loved the content of this book. It was informative and motivational. For me, it was required reading for a graduate course in leadership. It contained profound concepts about how to see yourself as an education and leader. The audience should not be limited to teachers or those who work in education. The audio version of this was problematic, however because I felt, quite often, like the playback was just a bit too slow. The reader who voiced the audio version has a very deep voice and speaks just a little too slowly. It lulled me into sleep quite a few times, and I strongly believe it was the performance, not the content. I could read the text in the book and remain quite engaged.

Would you be willing to try another one of Stefan Rudnicki’s performances?

No. Probably not.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By jillian grant on 02-25-17

Interesting though it went over my head a little.

Where does The Courage to Teach rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Somewhere in the middle, neither great, nor awful.

What other book might you compare The Courage to Teach to, and why?

Partly the 2 books I read about standards and accountability and partly time Out for Teachers and there's room For Me Here. It had enough case studies like those 2 books, but talked about methods of teaching a bit like the books on standards and accountability.

What does Stefan Rudnicki bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

I don't know as I didn't have any choice but to listen to it.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

NoMaybe the bit about the "student from hell" but I'm not sure if anything else did.

Any additional comments?

I'm not a teacher so maybe I shouldn't be surprised that some of this book drifted over my head somewhat. still, it had enough interest to keep me going.

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