Business Law: Contracts : The Great Courses: Business & Economics

  • by The Great Courses
  • Narrated by Professor Frank B. Cross
  • Series: The Great Courses: Business & Economics
  • 6 hrs and 10 mins
  • Lecture

Publisher's Summary

What is a contract? How can you make one binding? How can you avoid being prematurely bound by one? What remedies are available if someone breaches your contract? These questions and the other important issues of legally enforceable promises are covered in these eight lectures.
As you'll learn in these eight lectures, contractual agreements are one of the principal mechanisms for ordering life in society. Professor Cross lays a comprehensive foundation in the practical and intricate body of law that governs contracts. Throughout his expertly delivered lectures, he guides you through a range of topics and issues and helps you finally make better sense of business contracts-in all their seemingly overwhelming complexity.
You'll explore the boundaries of contracts in law, including the four main requirements that any contract must satisfy. You'll unpack the Uniform Commercial Code of the United States, which incorporated common law about commercial contracts into state statutes. You'll learn about the main components of a contract (such as the preliminary issues of offer and acceptance, the definiteness of a contract's terms, and the ability of parties to negotiate). You'll also review problems associated with the performance and enforcement of a contract, including how much of a performance is required to consider a contract discharged and the categories of persons who are permitted to enforce agreements. Please note: This course is not intended to provide financial or investment advice. All investments involve risk: Past performance does not guarantee future success. You acknowledge that any reliance on any information from the materials contained in this course shall be at your own risk.


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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

Excellent with two quibbles

I enjoyed these lectures on US contract law. They were presented at a fairly high-level, as you'd expect, but I felt they hit all the key areas. Professor Cross has an amiable, easy style that makes the lectures very enjoyable and hopefully less intimidating for non-lawyers.

I wanted to give the lectures five stars across the board, but I felt the need to withhold a star for two reasons. My reasons may be minor and may something to do with my preferred style of learning, but together I felt they warranted four instead of five overall stars.

First, for a somewhat complex topic like contract law where many topics/sub-topics are covered, it would have been helpful to have been given a "road map" and then reminded of it from time to time. By a roadmap, I mean a summary of the topics to be covered and their roles and important inter-relationships and status report of which we'd covered and which we were still coming down the pike.

Second, I felt that the professor should have been more precise about the facts of the cases he mentioned. It was a bit weird to first hear something, `This was a case about the purchase of a boat by a policeman` and then, `No, sorry, it was a case about a car bought by a policeman or a fireman or someone`. The legal point the professor was making was not lost because he got the relevant facts right, but the confusion about other facts seemed a bit unpolished, especially given the relatively small number of cases.

One more point: it would have been nice to have the case names so the keeners among us could have Googled them.

Still, overall very enjoyable.

I wish there were more law-related lectures like these available on Audible.
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- Nothing really matters "Rob Thomas"

This lecture makes sense

I know nothing about the law so I thought I'd try to learn something. This is a great lecturer. I've listened to it twice. He's interesting and gives good examples. I enjoy his cases - the partnership that went to court because one partner didn't think the other was being fair in sharing the goods.... and they ended up hung because they were highwaymen. Vocabulary is important but he gives good definitions. I think I have a better understanding because of this book.
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- Cynthia

Book Details

  • Release Date: 07-08-2013
  • Publisher: The Great Courses