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Publisher's Summary

In 1967, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., isolated himself from the demands of the civil rights movement, rented a house in Jamaica with no telephone, and labored over his final manuscript. In this prophetic work, which was unavailable for more than 10 years, he lays out his thoughts, plans, and dreams for America's future, including the need for better jobs, higher wages, decent housing, and quality education. With a universal message of hope that continues to resonate, King demanded an end to global suffering, asserting that humankind - for the first time - has the resources and technology to eradicate poverty.
©1967 Estate of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (P)2018 Random House Audio
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Brian M on 03-16-18

Well worth the read and still very relevant.

Living in 2018 and reading this book there are several surprises as MLK talks about well known issues like racism and other issues I hadn't expect him to touch on like the effect of automation.

As tensions between the US and North Korea grow his comments on how we invest in was are still relevant.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Devon Wilson on 03-09-18

Still relevant

I liked how many of the ills addressed in the book are still incredibly relevant today, although some of the solutions cited may be less so. It's unfortunate that women are seldom addressed - JD Jackson acknowledges that in the beginning. Would absolutely recommend.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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