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Publisher's Summary

In January 2015, Barbara Lipska - a leading expert on the neuroscience of mental illness - was diagnosed with melanoma that had spread to her brain. Within months, her frontal lobe, the seat of cognition, began shutting down. She descended into madness, exhibiting dementia- and schizophrenia-like symptoms that terrified her family and coworkers. But miraculously, just as her doctors figured out what was happening, the immunotherapy they had prescribed began to work. Just eight weeks after her nightmare began, Lipska returned to normal. With one difference: she remembered her brush with madness with exquisite clarity.
In The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind, Lipska describes her extraordinary ordeal and its lessons about the mind and brain. She explains how mental illness, brain injury, and age can change our behavior, personality, cognition, and memory. She tells what it is like to experience these changes firsthand. And she reveals what parts of us remain, even when so much else is gone.
©2018 Barbara K. Lipska and Elaine McArdle (P)2018 HighBridge, a division of Recorded Books
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Pamela Harvey on 06-17-18

This narrator? Not a fan.

I am giving this book a 5/5 because of its genre: memoir in a medical/science setting. My favorites! Medical and psych details of this book are thoroughly presented, though at times seeming a bit "dumbed down". I would guess this is to simplify the story and give non-medical readers a handle on the brain and all its vast capabilities. Plus it helps to move the story fast without dwelling on small or technical details. I am part of that "non-medical" audience, but I am also an armchair medical geek, and would have enjoyed a more technical focus.

The choice of the narrator doesn't make sense to me, due to her voice, which sounds too old for this protagonist. She has quite a well-defined British tonality and speech cadence and I don't get the reason for driving the story using such a colloquial accent. Compare this narrator to the contemporary professional voice from "Still Alice" and "Every Note Played", where the voice is calm, straightforward, professional and appropriate for a skilled neuroscientist.

But I did manage to accustom my ears to this sound, so that after a certain point I could ignore it.

I especially could not buy this character sounding like a children's book reader. Very juvenile and almost like she is talking down to her audience, not realistic in my view.

I do recommend this book with my five stars, but with the warning that the voice is not consistent with the story and the sing song dialog requires a huge suspension of disbelief.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Willow on 04-24-18

Fascinating Book, Beautifully Written and Read

This book is beautifully written, listening to it was a great pleasure. The story is engaging and moving, and the medical aspects of the neuroscientist's cancer and interlude of mental deficits are explained beautifully. I ended up listening to the entire book in only two sessions because I "couldn't put it down."

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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