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Publisher's Summary

On May 15, 2003, David McCullough presented "The Course of Human Events" as The 2003 Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities in Washington, DC. The Jefferson Lecture is a tribute to McCullough's lifetime investigation of history. In this short speech, this master historian tracks his fascination with all things historical to his early days in Pittsburgh where he "learned to love history by way of books" in bookshops and at the local library.
McCullough eloquently leads us through the founding fathers' attraction to history, letting us in on his composition of 1776 as well as the Pulitzer Prize-winning John Adams. His obvious affection for history is inspiring, because it encompasses the whole reach of the human drama. In McCullough's able hands, history truly "is a larger way of looking at life".
©2005 David McCullough; (P)2005 Simon & Schuster Inc. AUDIOWORKS is an imprint of Simon & Schuster Audio Division, Inc.
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Alan on 09-13-05

A Pitch for History

Everyone, school-age people in particular, should hear this short but superb talk by one of America's greatest historians. David McCullough, as anyone familiar with his work knows, creates what amount to wayback machines that plop us right into the events that made America. He portrays participants so vividly that they soon begin to seem like our old personal acquaintances.

In this recording McCullough tells how he got hooked on history, why history is so important to an understanding of our world... and why it's so much fun.

He points out here and in his book 1776 what isn't understood widely enough -- and this is why every American should hear this program -- that America's war for independence was an absurdly long shot, almost certain to fail. Yet thousands bet their lives and fortunes to go up against the world's only superpower -- and incredibly, after hardship and loss that is difficult for present-day Americans to imagine, they eventually won.

I just wish I'd been exposed to history by someone as inspirational as McCullough when I was fourteen.

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62 of 62 people found this review helpful


By Craig on 04-14-09

Stupendous

David McCullough has three things going for him.
1) is that he has an amazing voice for an author
2) is that he could make a phone book sound facinating, and
3) is that David McCullough knows what he is talking about.
For a short read, you cannot go wrong with this book.

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16 of 16 people found this review helpful

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