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Publisher's Summary

This audiobook is the personal memoir of an urban couple's journey to farming rather than a how-to guide and is sure to delight those interested in moving to the country or simply learning more about the struggles of sustainable farming.
When Tim and Liz Young decided to leave their comfortable suburban life and become first-time farmers in rural Georgia, they embarked on a journey that would change their lives. The Accidental Farmers reveals how the couple learned that hamburgers, bacon, and eggs don't come from the supermarket but from real animals that forge emotional bonds with their human caretakers. Seeking a middle path between a meatless lifestyle and the barbarism of factory food, Tim and Liz created Nature's Harmony Farm, a sustainable oasis where rare-breed animals and humans live together, searching for something nearly lost by both humans and the animals...how to live naturally off the land.
©2011 Tim Young (P)2015 Tim Young
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Critic Reviews

"With wit, humor and precision, Tim mesmerizes the reader as he and Liz learn how to achieve a life of harmony with the natural world." (Mildred Armstrong Kalish, author of Little Heathens)
"Tim and Liz Young describe the many benefits of a return to agrarian life.... In a most compelling way, they present that beautiful equation: healthy soil equals healthy animals equals healthy human beings." (Sally Fallon Morell, author of Nourishing Traditions)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Ray on 02-21-16

Not So Much

I can see now why some people have criticized this guy. The book overall is entertaining enough but it's definitely on the bottom of the list for this genre.

The author suffers from having had some success as a businessman in his prior life and subsequently brings a kind of smugness to his farming and writing. Starting with a substantial bank-roll, he fails to appreciate what it is really like to start a farm with an eye of actually needing to be a successful farmer in order to survive - as a farmer. I've read plenty of testimonies from true, bootstrapping homesteaders who shared this zeal for natural food, etc and there is always a sincere humility in their learning process.

All in all he doesn't seem to have set out to be a full time farmer inasmuch as someone who writes about farming and maybe builds a small brand of sorts so he can do seminars, etc. i.e. it was never about farming for farming's sake but rather to create a kind of farming brand for himself.

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7 of 7 people found this review helpful


By Amazon Customer on 08-08-16

A good read

Would you consider the audio edition of The Accidental Farmers: An Urban Couple, a Rural Calling and a Dream of Farming in Harmony with Nature to be better than the print version?

That's hard to know since I didn't read the print version, but for me, the story was told in the emotions of the reader, who transmitted the author's angst at the loss of animals in the early years of the farm.

What did you like best about this story?

The good, the bad, and the ugly - the story moving to the country wasn't made to sound like a sweet or banal withdrawal from the rat race, but a challenging change of life style.

What does Don Moffit bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

The story was told in the emotions of the reader, who transmitted the author's angst at the loss of animals in the early years of the farm.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Too many chicks.

Any additional comments?

I've been telling all my friends about this book -- it really made me think about where my food comes from.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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