Tales from Both Sides of the Brain

  • by Michael S. Gazzaniga
  • Narrated by Johnny Heller
  • 12 hrs and 1 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

Michael S. Gazzaniga, "the father of cognitive neuroscience", gives us an exciting behind-the-scenes look at his seminal work on the enigmatic coupling of the right and left brain.
In the mid-20th century, Michael S. Gazzaniga made one of the great discoveries in the history of neuroscience: split-brain theory, the notion that the right and left hemispheres of the brain can act independently from each other and have different strengths.
In Tales from Both Sides of the Brain, Gazzaniga tells the story of his passionate, entrepreneurial life in science and his decades-long journey to understand how the separate spheres of our brains communicate and miscommunicate their separate agendas. From his time as an ambitious undergraduate at Dartmouth, as a member of its now famed "Animal House" fraternity, and his life as a diligent graduate student in California to the first experiments he conducted in his own lab; from meeting his first split-brain patients to his collaboration with esteemed intellectuals across disciplines, Gazzaniga recounts the trajectory of his discoveries. In his engaging and accessible style, he paints a vivid portrait not only of his discovery of split-brain theory, but also of his comrades in arms - the many patients, friends, and family members who have accompanied him on this wild ride of intellectual discovery.
By turns humorous and moving, Tales from Both Sides of the Brain uses an extraordinary discovery about the nature of human consciousness to tell an enthralling story of how science gets done.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

The brain science was all that was interesting

If this author had stuck to the brain science, the book would have been terrific. The personal and endless academic stories were boring and tiresome. I don't care what or where you ate when you were with another brilliant friend at another spectacular restaurant. If I had heard the word Dartmouth one more time, I would have gagged. How many times can one write about moving to another academic location and planning another meeting at some "special" location? The hyperbole drips at every turn. The authors friends and students were ALL brilliant and awesome and smart and well, just plain phenomenal. Much of the book was a giant self-directed pat on the back. I don't think I read one word about the author ever using their discoveries to help mankind suffering from neurological disease. The brain is interesting. The authors personal life and pretentious attitude was not.
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- buckeye2

Interesting but tedious

This book offers some interesting insights into the workings of the human brain, but those insights are needles buried in a huge haystack of autobiographical anecdotes that I found I particularly interesting or relevant and often quite tedious.
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- Michael D. Busch

Book Details

  • Release Date: 02-03-2015
  • Publisher: HarperAudio