• Mr Briggs' Hat

  • A Sensational Account of Britain's First Railway Murder
  • By: Kate Colquhoun
  • Narrated by: John Telfer
  • Length: 9 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Release date: 08-19-11
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Audible Studios
  • 2.5 (2 ratings)

Regular price: $25.14

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Publisher's Summary

In July 1864, Thomas Briggs was travelling home after visiting his niece and her husband for dinner. He entered a First Class carriage on the 9.45pm Hackney service of the North London railway. At Hackney, two bank clerks entered the carriage and discovered blood in the seat cushions; also on the floor, windows and sides of the carriage. A bloodstained hat was found on the seat along with a broken link from a watch chain.
The race to identify the killer and catch him as he flees on a boat to America was eagerly followed by citizens both sides of the Atlantic.
Kate Colquhoun tells a gripping tale of a crime that shocked the nation.
©2011 Kate Colquhoun (P)2014 Audible, Inc.
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Robert on 01-04-12

Riveting and Educational

This excellently read, painstakingly researched audiobook tells the story of a factual Victorian railway murder and the subsequent pursuit of justice. It is however, much more than a whodunnit and it explores arguments about the management of evidence, the astute questioning of witnesses and moreover it debates the morality of capital punishment. The closing few chapters are tense, gripping and almost unbearable. the final chapter is perhaps a wee bit too long...phrenology indeed!
The book started slowly for me whilst the author necessarily established facts, but quickly gathered pace to an extent that I listened to the whole thing in just two sittings.
Comparisons with The Suspicions of Mr Whicher are as inevitable as they are invidious. I enjoyed both books although truthfully speaking, this one just edged it for me.

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7 of 7 people found this review helpful


By Mick on 11-08-17

Good stuff

I really enjoyed this book. Well read and kept me entertained to the end.
A seemingly small crime you’d think wouldn’t warrant a book of this length but it’s very good. Not repetitive in the slightest.
Good narration too

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