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Publisher's Summary

This science classic by Paul de Kruif chronicles the pioneering bacteriological work of the first scientists to see and learn from the microscopic world.
Paul de Kruif's Microbe Hunters is a timeless dramatization of the scientists, bacteriologists, doctors, and medical technicians who discovered microbes and invented the vaccines to counter them. De Kruif reveals the now seemingly simple but really fundamental discoveries of science - for instance, how a microbe was first viewed in a clear drop of rain water, and when, for the first time ever, Louis Pasteur discovered that a simple vaccine could save a man from the ravages of rabies by attacking the microbes that cause it.
©1926 Paul de Kruif; renewed 1954 Paul de Kruif (P)2017 Audible, Inc.
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Customer Reviews

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3 out of 5 stars
By eve on 05-14-18

Somewhat dated

The early chapters are still fairly fresh but as we get closer to the 20th century, the book shows its age. When he wrote this there were still no antibiotics and medicine was still at a point where they were celebrating arsenical compounds. There are some racist terms that were ok for 1926 but not appropriate for 2018 but I’m glad they were not edited out, to preserve the history, good or bad. Also need to remember that gay used to mean happy, since it is repeatedly used.

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