Love Is the Cure

  • by Elton John
  • Narrated by Elton John
  • 5 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

Audie Award Nominee, Nonfiction, 2013
In the 1980s, Elton John saw friend after friend, loved one after loved one, perish needlessly from AIDS. In the midst of the plague, he befriended Ryan White, a young Indiana boy ostracized by his town and his school because of the HIV infection he had contracted from a blood transfusion. Ryan's inspiring life and devastating death led Elton to two realizations: His own life was a mess. And he had to do something to help stop the AIDS crisis.
Since then, Elton has dedicated himself to overcoming the plague and the stigma of AIDS. He has done this through the Elton John AIDS Foundation, which has raised and donated $275 million to date to fighting the disease worldwide.
Love Is the Cure is Elton's personal account of his life during the AIDS epidemic, including stories of his close friendships with Ryan White, Freddie Mercury, Princess Diana, Elizabeth Taylor, and others, and the story of the Elton John AIDS Foundation. With powerful conviction and emotional force, Elton conveys the personal toll AIDS has taken on his life - and his infinite determination to stop its spread.
Elton writes, "This is a disease that must be cured not by a miraculous vaccine, but by changing hearts and minds, and through a collective effort to break down social barriers and to build bridges of compassion. Why are we not doing more? This is a question I have thought deeply about, and wish to answer - and help to change - by writing this book."
Sales of Love Is the Cure benefit the Elton John AIDS Foundation.

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What the Critics Say

"My friend Elton John has touched us all with his music and with the countless lives he has saved through his AIDS Foundation. Now he has given us a deeply personal story of struggle and perseverance in the fight against this terrible disease. Few people know more [than] Elton what it will take to end AIDS. His wonderful new book will convince you there's cause for hope - and inspire you to be part of the solution." (President Bill Clinton)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

Inspiring book

Where does Love Is the Cure rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

This is one of the best books I have heard in a long time. I knew that Elton John was involved in the AIDS fight, but I had no idea how much the foundation has achieved since its inception. Elton chronicles the history of not only the foundation but the fight against AIDS as well. It is a virtual primer on the fight and the efforts (for and against) to end this virus once and for all.

His account is clear, honest, perceptive, and cuts through the political nonsense that has surrounded the AIDS crisis.

If you want some plain and simple facts, get the book. He knows what he is talking about and has worked tirelessly to help end AIDS.


What was one of the most memorable moments of Love Is the Cure?

I liked how honest he was in the book. His honesty extends not only to others who did nothing to fight AIDS, but also to himself and how he did not act when he could have. After looking into his foundation some more, I think he has done a brilliant job making up for lost time.


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- jeff

No Bernie Taupin to fluff up the prose?

The inevitable criticism is "Elton should have had Bernie write this as well."

HOWEVER, despite the quality of the writing being less than amazing (and often annoyingly redundant), the book itself is quite good.

The stories are very touching and I can think of no better voice to deliver them than Elton's. Both the writing and recording feel vulnerably honest and this goes a long way to generate sympathy in his listeners. And, at least in the narrative portions of the book, sympathy seems to be his goal. Though he's definitely not burying the lead here. The most touching story by far is Ryan White's (i.e., chapter one).

Once he's finished telling Ryan's story, the theme of the book leans a bit heavier on the social stigmas surrounding HIV/AIDS and how those stigmas have led to government inaction.

Most of the emotion from this point on is just descriptions of emotion, such as "I was overjoyed" or "I was stunned" or (very plainly) "I was overcome with emotion."

The purpose of this part of the book isn't one of emotional augmentation though; it seems to be an effort to provoke social and political change. And I think he did so successfully. It felt like a very inspired and effective call for action. And that's how he ends his book.

Summary aside, the reading was very good. It's Elton John. No further comment is needed.

The writing was interesting though. If I were somehow made oblivious to the fact that he's a musician, I think I could have guessed. There are a lot of would-be closing lines that feel like they're supposed to function as a lyrical hook. But he doesn't leap into a chorus at that point. He just begins another sentence. And chapters are longer than verses, so it makes the writing a bit clunky here and there.

Criticism aside, the musician's memoir has become trendy to the point of cliche and, while some of them are interesting, Elton's is the only important one.
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- JJ Charles

Book Details

  • Release Date: 07-17-2012
  • Publisher: Hachette Audio