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Publisher's Summary

Ever since he was small, John Robison had longed to connect with other people. But by the time he was a teenager, his odd habits, including an inclination to blurt out non sequiturs, avoid eye contact, dismantle radios, and dig five-foot holes, had earned him the label "social deviant". No guidance came from his mother or his father. It was no wonder he gravitated to machines, which could, at least, be counted on. After fleeing his parents and dropping out of high school, his savant-like ability to visualize electronic circuits landed him a gig with KISS. Later, he drifted into a "real" job, as an engineer for a major toy company. But the higher Robison rose in the company, the more he had to pretend to be "normal" and do what he simply couldn't: communicate. It was not until he was 40 that an insightful therapist told him he had the form of autism called Asperger's syndrome. That understanding transformed the way Robison saw himself - and the world.
A born storyteller, Robison takes you inside the head of a boy teachers and other adults regarded as "defective". He also provides a fascinating reverse angle on the younger brother he left at the mercy of their nutty parents: the boy who would later change his name to Augusten Burroughs.
Ultimately, this is the story of Robison's journey from his world into ours, and his new life as a husband, father, and successful small business owner. It's a strange, sly, indelible account, sometimes alien, yet always deeply human.
©2007 John Elder Robison; (P)2007 Random House, Inc., Random House Audio, a division of Random House, Inc.
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Critic Reviews

"Thoughtful and thoroughly memorable." (Publishers Weekly)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Ashley on 11-17-13

Understanding Asperger's

If you could sum up Look Me in the Eye in three words, what would they be?

I listened to this book initially to help myself better understand those with Asperger's Syndrome. Not only did I feel that this book gave me a greater understanding of those with Asperger's, it was also just a wonderful story, that grabbed my attention, and kept me listening. I loved the author's candid discussion of his inner thoughts and feelings growing up in a world that did not understand, or accurately diagnose him.

What other book might you compare Look Me in the Eye to and why?

It had somewhat of a David Sedaris quality to it

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3 of 3 people found this review helpful


By Shane on 01-29-15

Thank You

My wife was recently diagnosed with Aspergers (bad speller) and your story helped me understand her better. However it was a great book on its own and I highly recommend it.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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