Immortal Bird

  • by Doron Weber
  • Narrated by Jonathan Davis
  • 14 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

Doron Weber delivers an affecting, unforgettable account of his struggle to protect his remarkable son. Born with a congenital heart defect, Damon Weber proves a source of constant inspiration to his parents even as his father Doron searches relentlessly for a breakthrough to resolve a condition that seems destined to claim Damon’s life. Living under this dire long-term prognosis, Damon nevertheless grows into a skilled actor - and an extraordinarily resilient human being.


What the Critics Say

“A powerful and lyric portrait of a son and a vibrant family.” (Toni Morrison)
“[A] detailed, harrowing narrative…a tender, clear-eyed profile of his son…Weber’s heartbreaking story gives us both a tragic cautionary tale and a moving account.” (Publishers Weekly)
“A heartsick father's poignant account of his heartsick son, and a primer on the fragility of life.” (Kirkus Reviews)


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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

A compelling memoir

Would you consider the audio edition of Immortal Bird to be better than the print version?

Heartbreaking story of a father’s devotion to his very ill son, and how a medical team’s complete and arrogant implosion has devastating consequences; a very bittersweet tribute to an amazing young man and the family that loved him

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- Martha

In Defense of Doron

Saw the blurb about this book in an alumni mag and was drawn in.

Most noteworthy in other reviews is commentary that the dad seemed too enraged at the medical community for not being able to save his son--that the dad (Doron) basically went on a tirade about how everyone who touched his son screwed it up. Reviewers (some) seem angry at the father for being so angry at the medical establishment.

Externally focused anger might be tagging along with his extreme sense of loss, powerlessness, love, and a not-altogether misguided rage with the medical establishment. Although there are many individual care providers who are talented, competent, etc., they at some level have to separate themselves from the emotional aspects of their patients or they will not deliver the type of care that is needed. That's why doctors aren't supposed to treat their families.

Although the broken healthcare system has within it many a disgruntled and self-considered disenfranchised provider, I don't think the father was unreasonable. He would have been really irresponsible, given his education, means, etc. NOT to do everything he could to further his son's treatment, including what sounds like (but is not necessarily) bullying doctors into doing their jobs.
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- Jennifer

Book Details

  • Release Date: 02-17-2012
  • Publisher: Recorded Books