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Publisher's Summary

Celebrated for her courageous exploits as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, Harriet Tubman has entered history as one of 19th-century America's most enduring and important figures. But just who was this remarkable woman? To John Brown, leader of the Harpers Ferry slave uprising, she was General Tubman. For the many slaves she led north to freedom, she was Moses. To the slaveholders who sought her capture, she was a thief and a trickster. To abolitionists, she was a prophet. Now, in a biography widely praised for its impeccable research and its compelling narrative, Harriet Tubman is revealed for the first time as a singular and complex character, a woman who defied simple categorization.
©2017 Catherine Clinton (P)2017 Hachette Audio
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Brandi S. Garner on 08-22-17

very informative!

I learned so much! She's definitely my Shero! I had no idea she did ALL the things she did outside of freeing slaves. She did so much humanitarian things, advocating for the indigent, women suffrage rights, served her Country in the military, etc!

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

2 out of 5 stars
By KMS on 07-11-18

Returning this book

First, white authors need to stay out of Black spaces. And that is clear in this case. What we know to be rape perpetrated by whites against Black enslaved women and girls, this author calls “coupling.” After describing back breaking work Ms Tubman was forced into, this author says Ms Tubman came to enjoy the physical exertion. I’m skeptical. I can’t imagine an enslaved person coming to enjoy back breaking work. Sometimes people adapt to terrible conditions in order to survive. After I heard the phrase “hired out” a half dozen times, I was done. Enslaved persons were not employees.
They weren’t *hired* by anyone.

At the same time, this author describes the terrible conditions well. I’m confused by her language choices and I think those choices matter.

I am returning this book and I will find a biography that doesn’t diminish any part of slavery

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