• by Patrick Schulte
  • Narrated by Nick O'Kelly
  • 10 hrs and 0 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

The story of a young couple who, without any prior sailing experience, decide one night over too many drinks that they are going to sail around the world. One year later they are bobbing around in the Bahamas on a 35 foot catamaran teaching themselves how to cross oceans in a small boat.
Along their way they meet amazing people, visit locations only accessible by those on their own yachts, become television actors in Australia, minor celebrities in Puerto Rico, and generally have a great time of it all.
They aren't your average cruisers by any stretch of the imagination, and run afoul of what most cruisers perceive to be "real" cruisers. But for four years they sailed around the world on their own terms.
This is their story, and is essential reading for anybody who has ever had the dream to sail around the world. This book just might push you over the edge, and the horizon.


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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

The author hates me, and probably you too

This was an interesting story, and I really wanted to like it and the author. Unfortunately the author is really negative (or maybe it's just the narrator's tone), and he expresses his dislike for his target audience (sailors) over and over and over again which gets really annoying.

My wife and I are younger than the author and his wife, we have also crossed oceans and taken multi-year cruises. We can relate to their mindset and frustrations with the cruising community... but seriously, stop complaining!

The author is also kind of oblivious to his own hypocrisy. Each chapter roughly follows the same basic structure: The author mocks other cruisers, leaves on passage, eats his own words, fails to realize it, repeat.

The following three scenarios happen so often that I have them memorized:

1. The author mocks other cruisers for their careful consideration of the weather, always followed by the author complaining about the crappy weather he is experiencing.

2. The author mocks other cruisers for provisioning their boats with food, he brags about leaving port with out supplies, and then complains about having no food to eat, or having nothing but canned meatballs every day, or canned hot dogs every day.

3. The author mocks other cruisers for being cautious, followed by the author taking stupid risks that he admits would have resulted in the loss of the boat but luckily "such and such" happens.

The three examples above are on constant repeat, and I think the book would have been SO MUCH more enjoyable had these common themes been consolidated when converting the blog into a book. But then again, if you take these parts out there probably wouldn't have been much "book" left.

The tag line of the book "just looking out for pirates" is another example of the author's hypocrisy. There are multiple points in the book in which the author rants about how pirates are nothing to worry about, and how other cruising are dumb if they worry about pirates. The author even enters a random Columbian port where their boat is boarded in the middle of the night. Later on they find out that the cruising guide says the port they went to is dangerous and should not be visited. They just laugh it off and continue to mock others who have mild concerns about safety.

Overall, it was a good, interesting story.
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- Chad


Unlike most books in this genre, which appear to be written by either the very young, solo sailors (Jessica Watts, Jesse Martin, Robin L. Graham and) or the older cicumnavigator, this book is written by a young couple. It hence offers a slightly different perspective. And at first I thought this might be a fairly refreshing and entertaining book.

Unfortunately, this young couple uses the book to pour scorn on the cruising fraternity as a whole and gloat how great they area and how easy it all comes to them. I guess it takes a bit of wisdom, which is generally gained with age, to appreciate to the real skill is to find commonalities rather then pick differences.

Listening to the book, I couldn't help thinking that these guys are a couple of conceited idiots whom, should I ever have have the misfortune to meet them on the ocean, I would steer well clear off.

Other than that, this is a fairly standard "milk run" cruising story. Neither particularly exciting nor particularly well told.

As such, there are better stories, including "Islands, Oceans, and Dreams: The True Story of a Sailor's Seven Year Solo Voyage Around the World" which is also available on Audible.

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- Werner

Book Details

  • Release Date: 05-21-2013
  • Publisher: David N Olberding