Blue Box Boy

  • by Matthew Waterhouse
  • Narrated by Matthew Waterhouse
  • 2 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

As a boy Matthew Waterhouse loved Doctor Who: he watched all the episodes and read all the novels and comic strips. What starts as a heart-warming story, of a boy growing up with Doctor Who as his trusted friend, engaging the listener with memories and nostalgia that will be familiar to any Doctor Who fan, takes a sudden twist when he is thrust into an alien and adult world - cast as Doctor Who's youngest ever travelling companion - for two of the series' most inventive seasons. Matthew's sense of wonder with his dream job and his love for the show are palpable; as is his shock at genuine hostilities between cast and crew members and considerable tensions on set, which are counterpointed with poignant reminders that he is just a boy, and still a fan, who finds himself in the absurd, comic world of minor celebrity. What follows is a story-by-story memoir of his time on the show, peppered with glimpses into Matthew's personal life, tales of conventions, DVD commentaries, and some revealing anecdotes about everyone from fellow actors to Doctor Who's more high-profile fans.
This memoir holds nothing back: written with honesty, warmth, a rapier wit and a good dose of self-depreciation, the book is essential listening for any "Doctor Who" fan. Finally, we get to hear Matthew's side of a story which has been told and embellished and imagined by fans and fellow actors for years. This affectionate and darkly humourous memoir is a record of what it was like to make Doctor Who, and to work for the BBC in early '80s, and is proof that you can take the actor out of Doctor Who, but you can never quite take Doctor Who out of the actor...

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

Wickedly Engaging

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes. Especially fans of the television series Doctor Who (1963-89, 1994, 2005- ). It is a wonderful insight into the production of classic Doctor who.


What did you like best about this story?

Due to the subject matter, this book is largely for fans of the television series Doctor Who, and it was entertaining, funny and delightful.

Matthew has an excellent voice for narrating and is excellent with his voice characterisation and energetic portrayal of his stories. His sharing of what it is like to be both a childhood fan of a tv institution such as Doctor Who and then find what the reality is like when he joins that same show (good and bad) is really fascinating.

I appreciated his candid sharing and really for the most part it was very humble and earthy. occasionally it was barbed and a touch bitter, but it clearly reflects the wounds of his time in th at role. It becomes clear that some expected too much of an eighteen year old who had started in a major television show with not a lot of prior experience and who was struggling at times to deal as best he could with his own insecurities and issues let alone others. The only thing i found off-putting was his use of the third person when referring to himself. The book was originally written in the third person but how i wished Matthew had just changed it to "I" and "me" in the audio narration. it would then have been quite perfect.

One can resonate with his comment that a few of his humorous comments made during his acting career were taken the wrong way, because some people cannot understand comic irony and miss the joke and take a comment on its literal level to the detriment of the person. This book is the better for Matthew narrating it. he is a natural and entertaining and humorous story teller. at one point i thought "gosh he sounds like Colin Baker." i also thought, you know if he played Adric now he would be a million times better albeit older. i reckon he would be an excellent Doctor. yes, you read that line correctly.

A couple of vignettes in the book i found confusing. a bit of clarification would help. I enjoyed the book and found it poignant.


Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes and I did


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- PAUL W. KELLY

Oddly stilted and pretentious

There is just something incredibly weird about an autobiography written in the third person. That offends is magnified when read by the author
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- Unreal Name

Book Details

  • Release Date: 07-16-2014
  • Publisher: What Noise Productions