Regular price: $6.95

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
Select or Add a new payment method

Buy Now with 1 Credit

By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Buy Now for $6.95

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

"Upon suffering beyond suffering: the Red Nation shall rise again and it shall be a blessing for a sick world. A world filled with broken promises, selfishness, and separations. A world longing for light again. I see a time of Seven Generations when all the colors of mankind will gather under the Sacred Tree of Life and the whole Earth will become one circle again." (Crazy Horse)
A lot of ink has been spilled covering the lives of history's most influential figures, but how much of the forest is lost for the trees? In Charles River Editors' American Legends series, listeners can get caught up to speed on the lives of America's most important men and women in the time it takes to finish a commute, while learning interesting facts long forgotten or never known.
As he lay dying, Tashunke Witco, whose name is literally translated as "His Horse is Spirited" or "His Horse is Crazy", refused to be placed on an army cot, and he insisted upon being placed on the floor. He had spent his life avoiding white people whenever possible, and after he died, his cousin, Touch the Clouds, pointed to the blanket covering the dead chief's body and said, "This is the lodge of Crazy Horse."
Throughout his life, Tashunke Witco tried to live the life his people had enjoyed for centuries. He never signed a treaty with the US government and was never photographed, largely because he wanted to avoid contact with the settlers encroaching further west upon Native American lands.
©2012 Charles River Editors (P)2015 Charles River Editors
Show More Show Less
No Reviews are Available
© Copyright 1997 - 2017 Audible, Inc