All Souls

  • by Michael Patrick MacDonald
  • Narrated by Michael Patrick MacDonald
  • 8 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

A breakaway best seller since its first printing, All Souls takes us deep into Michael Patrick MacDonald's Southie, the proudly insular neighborhood with the highest concentration of white poverty in America. Rocked by Whitey Bulger's crime schemes and busing riots, MacDonald's Southie is populated by sharply hewn characters like his Ma, a mini-skirted, accordion-playing single mother who endures the deaths of four of her eleven children. Nearly suffocated by his grief and his community's code of silence, MacDonald tells his family story here with gritty but moving honesty.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

If I could' I would've finished the book in a sing

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes. I downloaded All Souls on 6/17 and and finished all 8 hours and 24 minutes of it by this 6/21. And this is with a full time job that includes travel, a 2 year old at home and assorted other activities. I was hooked from the moment I started. I am about as far removed from Southie as can be. I was born in India to middle class parents with the means to educate me, came to the US when I was 28 and being in IT, have managed to carve out a comfortable suburban existence for the 15 years I have been in the US. But I have always been in part fascinated and in part befuddled by the poverty in America. In India, and in other 3rd world countries, the poor are everywhere and in your face. In the US they remain hidden in places like Southie and even there too there is a narrative that seems to cast this sheen of quasi prosperity on them. I think America is in denial about its poor and books like these are a window into their lives. And with one political party capable of only mean spiritedness towards the poor and the other making only half hearted attempts towards any form of poverty alleviation, people like Michael Macdonald play an indispensable role today in educating us of our problems as well as suggesting concrete steps towards helping the poor.I think the best way to describe the book was that by the end, I felt a sense of kinship and connection with all the characters in the book, particularly the mother. And this, when I have very little in common with them. That is a sign of a good book, one that appeals to your emotions and exposes you to a world beyond your own and motivates you to take action.Highly recommended.


Who was your favorite character and why?

Michael's mother.


Have you listened to any of Michael MacDonald’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

No.


Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

YES!


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- Shantanu Sharma "Happy Man"

An Irish Ballad

I generally don't like memoirs and don't usually like when authors read their own work. In this case I enjoyed both. To say I "enjoyed" the book is not exactly correct, it was an awesome book, but really sad, just like an Irish ballad. The author brought the world of his childhood to life and I felt like I was there with his family, sitting in their apartment and looking out their window. The sorrows and the joys, the hopefulness and the tragedies, he describes them all in an unflinchingly honest way.MacDonald is a testiment to the human spirit, he turned his life around and used his pain to help others. Listen to this one!!
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- Taryn "Addicted to Audible!"

Book Details

  • Release Date: 06-04-2013
  • Publisher: Audible Studios