The Lady in Gold

  • by Anne-Marie O'Connor
  • Narrated by Coleen Marlo
  • 10 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

"The Lady in Gold", a portrait considered an unforgettable masterpiece, one of the 20th century's most recognizable paintings, made headlines all over the world when Ronald Lauder bought it for $135 million a century after Klimt, the most famous Austrian painter of his time, completed the society portrait.
Anne-Marie O'Connor, writer for the Washington Post, formerly of the Los Angeles Times, tells the galvanizing story of the Lady in Gold, Adele Bloch-Bauer, a dazzling Viennese Jewish society figure; daughter of the head of one of the largest banks in the Hapsburg Empire, head of the Oriental Railway, whose Orient Express went from Berlin to Constantinople; wife of Ferdinand Bauer, sugar-beet baron.
The Bloch-Bauers were art patrons, and Adele herself was considered a rebel of fin de siècle Vienna (she wanted to be educated, a notion considered “degenerate” in a society that believed women being out in the world went against their feminine "nature"). The author describes how Adele inspired the portrait and how Klimt made more than a hundred sketches of her - simple pencil drawings on thin manila paper.
And O'Connor writes of Klimt himself, son of a failed gold engraver, shunned by arts bureaucrats, called an artistic heretic in his time, a genius in ours. She writes of the Nazis confiscating the portrait of Adele from the Bloch-Bauers' grand palais; of the Austrian government putting the painting on display, stripping Adele's Jewish surname from it so that no clues to her identity (nor any hint of her Jewish origins) would be revealed. Nazi officials called the painting, "The Lady in Gold" and proudly exhibited it in Vienna's Baroque Belvedere Palace, consecrated in the 1930s as a Nazi institution.
The author writes of the painting, inspired by the Byzantine mosaics Klimt had studied in Italy, with their exotic symbols and swirls, the subject an idol in a golden shrine. We see how, 60 years after it was stolen by the Nazis, the Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer became the subject of a decade-long litigation between the Austrian government and the Bloch-Bauer heirs, how and why the U.S. Supreme Court became involved in the case, and how the Court's decision had profound ramifications in the art world.
In this book listeners will find riveting social history; an illuminating and haunting look at turn-of-the-century Vienna; a brilliant portrait of the evolution of a painter; a masterfully told tale of suspense. And at the heart of it, The Lady in Gold - the shimmering painting, and its equally irresistible subject, the fate of each forever intertwined.


What the Critics Say

"O'Connor resurrects fascinating individuals and tells a many-faceted, intensely affecting, and profoundly revelatory tale of the inciting power of art and the unending need for justice." (Booklist)


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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

It sounded like Siri was reading the book

Is there anything you would change about this book?

I would hire a good editor to shape a story and not allow for the off-topic details and the inconsistent presentation of the material (flowery in one area, list of factoids in another, and redundant in spots). The strongest narrative was the last few paragraphs - why wasn't this material rephrased and used at the beginning to draw readers in?

How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

Two words: cohesive narrative

How did the narrator detract from the book?

OMG - monotone with an inability to break sections into phrases. Reading aloud is like music, add some dynamics, some change in pitch, use pauses effectively.

If this book were a movie would you go see it?

For once, I'm trusting Hollywood will do a better job of presenting the story than the book. (And now I'll go look up who the screenwriter is as s/he will deserve an award of some type if they managed to make an intelligible narrative where this book failed.)

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- Terri L. Weast

Get a better narrator.

What didn’t you like about Coleen Marlo’s performance?

It would be bad enough if it were just her uninspired reading of the book - she just races through with no inflection to give life to the story; however, the real failure is her mispronunciation of so many words and names. Didn't it occur to an editor to correct her when, for example, she pronouced "fraulein" as "frow-line" when it's supposed to be "froy-line." Or, even worse, pronouncing the German article "Die" as "dye" rather than "dee." English words get treated badly, too. She apparently has no idea how to correctly say "hegemony." There are, alas, too many other examples to mention.

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- David A Weatherbie

Book Details

  • Release Date: 12-24-2012
  • Publisher: Tantor Audio