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Curious

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5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-10-18

Goats and murder -- interesting combo

I enjoy Lynn Cahoo's books because they're fluffy enough that I don't have to give my full attention but have enough meat on the bones to make it interesting and just that tad of romance to give some spice to the mixture. This book was recipe made and hit the spot. However, I think I missed something, because when I zoned back in, the characters were talking about taking care of the kids. In a book with goats as the centerpiece, I question the use of that word relating to anything but baby goats. Needless to say, I was confused for a bit until I (virtually) rolled the narration back to where I must have fallen asleep. All in all, Cahoon's latest offering gets a five star because it does what any cozy mystery is supposed to do -- entertains without offense.

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5 of 6 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-05-18

A wonderful Clines rollic

How could Peter Clines be surprised that his fans, when they found it, would snap up his latest. I don't visit Facebook that often, so don't have Clines friended or followed. Thus the delay in getting to Paradox Bound. Having Ray Porter narrate thr book thenwas a major plus. Following Harriet and Eli bounding through the weres and might have beens of American history in Eleanor, the Model A, in search if the missing American Dream was a great way to escape the shambles of the America that is. It was a feeding much needed by the spark of pride in my country that still gleams deep in my heart. My logic sees no hope for us, my heart still hopes. Paradox Bound nurtures that hiope, no matter how naive.

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5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-30-17

Nice lively performance

Shaun Grinnell ' s lively performance with the lilting Scottish brogue I am used to really made this particular outing of Hamish Macbeth entertaining. Hamish sorting out the tangles in this Highland mystery was a headshaker for one who likes to hold the threads if the plot in their mind.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-29-17

Who is really writing Hamish and Agatha?

Given the radical departure in content, style, tone and plot from previous offerings of both the Hamish Macbeth and Agatha Raisin series, I am constrained to ask, who is really writing these two series now?

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-22-17

The Sullivan girls grow on you

Despite my deep dislike of the romance genre, i feel that this author did an exceptional job in balancing realistic human feelings with a just as realistic plot revolving around the changing dynamics of a multi-generational family in flux. i grew to truly care about and enjoy the characters in this book and what happens to them as the story progresses. The narrator gives a fine performance as she settles into the voice of each character. I am very looking forward to the next installment in this story. The author has left plenty of intriguing threads hanging out there for us to grab onto in anticipation of story resolution.

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5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-20-17

A delight that sneaks up on you

Very much appreciated how the author built a realistic family story this reader could relate to and found the choice of narrators spot on and perfect. The blend of believable romance with the everyday problems of everyday people resulted in a very satisfactory story that made me want to go on to the next installment.

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5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-07-17

A ghost story in the old tradition

A well-crafted story in the traditional style, the sort of ghost story that scares you without being bloody or otherwise ridiculous. The characters were stunningly brought to life by the narration, truly frightening, as frightened as one would be if these events were to happen to person in real life. This is a great story to read on All Hallows Eve, or the week leading up to it with the final horror being revealed by candlelight on the final night. Wonderful story, excellent writing.

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5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-15-17

A Continuing Gift

Anne Hillerman indeed inherited the full measure of her father's talent, sensitivity, and love of the Four Corners area and its Indian population. This installment of the series her father started is such a gift from Anne. She is following her father in laying out the political and financial games the European invaders continue to perpetuate on that land and those people and it makes one feel so helpless. Many thank, Anne, for not letting things be forgotten while telling a good story. While we have been used to a different narrator for the series, I found Christina Delaine's narration excellent and her Navajo pronunciation reflected some very hard work on her part. I was well pleased with this book.

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4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-12-17

Slow starter

This installment of John Milton was a show starter, dragged, and generally was not as engaging as the previous two books. But every author has a few like that and with Dawson working as hard as he is to keep his readers entertained, I'm not going to fault him for having a dip. Thorpe had his narrating hands full with a book that was ninety-nine percent American accents. He did a laudable job and can't be faulted for the lapses that did occur. Overall, the book was okay but I hope Dawson picks up the pace again in his next offering of Ghosts.

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5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-16-17

One of the best from Wodehouse

This little number was one of the most adroitly plotted frolics Wodehouse produced. Trying to untangle the yarn would only spoil it for a listener who has not yet had the pleasure of hearing it. I will just say it was a very fun non-Jeeves/Wooster tale to lighten the day and Jonathan Cecil did an excellent job of narration.

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