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Jean

Santa Cruz, CA, United States
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4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-17-18

A Fun Trip to the Southwest

I was a big fan of Tony Hillerman’s books. When his daughter Anne, started writing, I began following her. She has big shoes to fill as Tony was a master storyteller. Anne has improved with each book which makes it fun to watch a writer grow. In this book Jim Chee is in Santa Fe at a training conference. Bernie Manuelito covers for a fellow officer to give a talk to a group of children on a camping trip. One of their leaders goes missing and Bernie is in for lots of work, danger and solving a mystery.

Hillerman does a great job in describing the scenery and Navaho customs and spiritual beliefs. To me, this makes the story much more enjoyable. The book is well written and the plot twists and weaves about. The suspense builds but there is also some humor tossed into the story. I cannot wait for the next book.

The book is a little over ten hours. Christina Delaine does an excellent job narrating the story. Delaine is an actress. She has won multiple Earphone Awards for her audiobook narrations.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-14-18

Engaging

Before reading John McCain’s new book “The Restless Wave”, I decided to reread his book “Faith of Our Fathers”. I originally read this book in 2009. I am glad I reviewed McCain’s life considering his cancer and the politics of the day.

In “Faith of Our Fathers” McCain reviews his early life and tells about the lives of his grandfather and father. Both men became 4-star admirals. His father was head of CINCPAC during part of the Viet Nam War. I found his stories about growing up as a “navy brat” most interesting. The military culture is unique. McCain also covered his life as a POW. The story ends with his release from the POW facility. If McCain writes a book about his life from his release to the present, I would enjoy reading it.

The book is just about five hours. John McCain did a good job with the narration of the book. I enjoy listening to the author read his book particularly a well-known man like McCain whose voice I recognize.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-07-18

Fun Space Opera

The first part of the book summarizes the prior book. The middle and end are the current story. In this episode there is no action until the last part of the book. Nathan is attempting to gather more allies and ships for their fight against the Jung. While visiting a planet he is challenged to an obstacle race, but he has to fly their fighter plane while knowing this is a trick set up by the break away Jung tribe trying to take over the sector. This is when all the action begins including a space battle.

The book is well written. I have enjoyed all the books in the two series. They make a great escape read.

I read this as an audiobook downloaded from Audible. The book is almost eleven hours. Jeffrey Kafer does a suburb job narrating the series.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-06-18

An inside look

I found this book about the Six Days of War by Michael B. Oren most interesting. At the time I remember following the news about the war on T. V. I have read biographies of many of the key people in this book so I am very familiar with the events. It was great to have all the information in one place in chronological order. It helped me to understand the events better as well as what is going on today in Israel.

The book is well written and meticulously researched. The author covered in detail all the events leading to the war as well as the war itself. I noted the author was born and educated in the United States but moved to Israel in 1973. Oren became Israel’s Ambassador to the United States. He writes with the understanding of the workings of the Israeli government. Oren did not present an unbiased review of the events. If you are interested in the history of Israel or the Middle East this book will provide information about an important event.

The book is almost eighteen hours. Robert Whitfield does an excellent job narrating the book.



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3 of 3 people found this review helpful

3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-05-18

Engaging

I started listening to “The Murder List” right after I had surgery for a fractured ankle. I am sure the book is good, but I just could not get into it. It started off slow so that might also have been a factor.

The story was about a British police officer whose young daughter was killed in a convenience store shooting five year before. He is on the hunt for the killer. This is book one of a new series about Zac Boateng. In the future I might try to next book.

I read this as an audiobook downloaded from Audible. The book is nine and a half hours. Damian Lynch does a good job narrating the book.

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3 of 3 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-04-18

A sad non-fiction account

I found this book “Killers of the Flower Moon” most interesting particularly about the early days of the FBI and of J. Edgar Hoover. In this particular case Hoover had to hire retired Texas Rangers as FBI agents because they could blend in and knew the social customs of the area.

I was angered and disgusted by yet another horrible example of the greed of the white men assigned to be guardians of the Osage people. They would have at least been alive if left on their own. This book was a good example of the methodical work to solve a series of murders. This story is a fascinating read and it is a true story.

I read this as an audiobook downloaded from Audible. The book is nine hours and 4 minutes. Will Paton does a good job narrating the book. He has an easy to listen to voice.

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2 of 3 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-06-18

Excellent

I remember sitting in a high school class years ago in Canada learning about Alexander Mackenzie’s discovery of the Mackenzie River. At 1,100 miles, it is North Americas second largest river. Then as per usual in those days I would start to day dream about traversing the river with Mackenzie in his hunt for the northwest passage. Alexander Mackenzie made the trip in Jun 1789 with a crew of thirteen, made up of voyageurs and native people. In June 2016 Brian Castren made the same trip in a fiberglass canoe with all modern equipment and camping food. Setting off from the Great Slave Lake at the same spot as Mackenzie he followed his route to the Beaufort Sea. The major change in the two hundred plus year is the retreating of the ice.

The book is well written and researched. Oh, how I would have loved to do that trip myself. But with the book I can mentally travel it. I know the area of the North West Territories fairly well. I have kayaked parts of the Mackenzie River as well as the Lake Hattah area back in the 1950s. The book is in part the history of the Mackenzie trip of discovery and a travel log by Castren as he made the trip in Mackenzie’s footsteps. If you like history of discovery and a travel adventure this book is for you.

I read this as an audiobook downloaded from Audible. The book is just over twelve hours. The author narrated the book.

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3 of 4 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-06-18

A Great Story

I have thoroughly enjoyed this series. This is book fourteen in the Maisie Dobbs series. Maisie was a nurse in World War One; then trained to be a psychologist/investigator after the war. The story opens in May 1940. Great Britain is again at war with Germany. Maisie has been hired to investigate the disappearance of a fifteen-year-old boy, Joseph Combes. He is an apprentice painter working for a company that has a government contract to go about the countryside to paint a special fire-retardant chemical on strategic government and military buildings.

The book is well written and researched. The author has the story set with a background of Dunkirk and the battle of Britain. This is a great historical novel. The plot twist and turns around family drama. I have read that Winspear bases a lot of the plot on her own family’s experiences. If you enjoy historical novels this book would provide you great enjoyment.

I read this as an audiobook downloaded from Audible. The book is ten and a half hours. Orlagh Cassidy does a superb job narrating the book. Cassidy is one of my favorite narrators. Cassidy is an actress, voice over artist and award-winning audiobook narrator.

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4 of 5 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-06-18

Engaging

J. A. Jance is one of my favorite mystery authors. This is book number thirteen in the Ali Reynolds series. Usually you can start a Jance series at any point but this book is written as a continuation of the prior book “Man Overboard” so it is best to read book twelve first. Jance delves into some hot and timely topics in this book such as cyber security and bitcoins. Also, a carryover from the prior novel is the artificial Intelligence “Frigg”.

The book is well written and the plot is intriguing. As usual Jance has multiple subplots intertwining. The characters are fascinating and become the reader’s friend after a few books. Jance makes the reader part of the family. It is great to watch how the character Stuart Ramey has developed over the series. Jance is a master story teller. If you enjoy a good mystery story this is a must-read series.

I read this as an audiobook downloaded from Audible. The book is almost eleven and a half hours. Karen Ziemba has done an excellent job narrating the series. Ziemba won the Tony Award in 2000 for the Best Featured Actress in a Musical. Ziemba is an actress and audiobook narrator.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-29-18

Inspiring

This is an interesting book about the history of women coders, engineers, mathematicians, entrepreneurs as well as visionaries who helped create and shape the internet. Evans even discusses Ada Lovelace, the mathematician daughter of Lord Byron.

The book is well written and researched. Evans is a journalist so the writing style is that of a journalist. Evans reviews the stories of women scientists such as the famous Grace Hopper, who worked on Harvard Mark One, to more recent women such as Stanford University scientist Elizabeth Feinler. She also includes programmer Brenda Laurel, a gamer entrepreneur. I found the story about Radia Perlman most interesting. Perlman invented a protocol for moving information to the way computers are networked. I had no idea so many women have achieved so much with so little recognition. I highly recommend this book.

The book is nine hours. The author narrated the book.

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6 of 7 people found this review helpful