LISTENER

A. L. DeWitt

Jefferson City, MO United States
  • 78
  • reviews
  • 521
  • helpful votes
  • 104
  • ratings
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-18-17

Plot Holes You Could Walk Through

Our hero is a wounded combat vet who came home from over there with a skill set that he couldn't commercialize, so he and a friend started hunting down other assassins. It's an interesting premise, but the plot holes in this one are so big, and the resolution of the critical conflict so unbelievable that it makes it difficult to credit what was otherwise a novel approach to the assassin for hire genre.
If you like Tom Wood, Mark Greaney, Mark Dawson, et al., you're apt to be feeling a little lost when this one is done.

Read More Hide me

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-18-17

Second Tier One Book

This is the second in the Tier One series, and while the conflict seems mostly confined to the interpersonal in this one, its still a worthy listen. The bad guys are believably bad, and sadly the good guys are annoying wimpy in places. But, what can I say, it all works out in the end.
I don't think this is as strong as the first Tier One novel, but it is an excellent second entry in the series and worth the money.

Read More Hide me

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-18-17

Twists and Turns

Thomas Perry is like no other author. Where other authors would turn left, he makes a U turn. His plotting is interesting, and his characters rarely act out of character.
This book is a great example of how you can take an unlikeable character (Kapic) and make him likable by the end of the book. But the twists at the end you don't see coming are awesome, and reflect the way the world actually works.
There are a few plot holes in this one that you can figure out on your own. I won't spoil the book by revealing them. They do not detract from the enjoyment of the book. The only thing I can say is I wish that we had more back-story on "Joe Carver."
This book is a good listen, and a good story.

Read More Hide me

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-25-17

One of Perry's best

The Butcher's Boy is not a model of morality. He kills, and its a living. But when the hunter becomes the hunted, his reversal of fortune sends him spiraling down alleys with no way out. Add to this the FBI agent out to catch him, who intuits his existence from statistical data.
While it starts out hard to suspend disbelief, the book is a thrill ride that gets better with every new chapter, and leaves you wishing for more. Thankfully there are two sequels to this book, and they're every bit as good as this one.
The research in the book, the description of gun play, the use of alternate identification, and the reliance on fact over fiction in the areas of guns are all things that make this book shine. Great narration by Michael Kramer seals the deal.

Read More Hide me

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-25-17

Pike's at it again!

If you follow the mythical Pike Logan and his merry band of off-the-books soldiers, you know that each installment brings with it an even more hair-raising and out of the box kind of adventure. The story here is no different, with malevolent bad guys, reasonable good guys, and an ending that is, in most respects, believable.
Over the years Taylor has given us some memorable rides, and this one is pretty good. I like the way we have one voice for Pike's character, and another for everything else. It makes it easy to understand who is doing what.
Overall, a good book, but listen to the others first so you can understand the interplay between characters.

Read More Hide me

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-25-17

A Hero's Story

This book is the tale of two SEALs who went to great length to accomplish their mission, and at the same time, take care of each other. The description of the events is very good, and the description of the rescues riveting.

Read More Hide me

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-25-17

Leaves You Wanting More

I started listening to Thomas Perry with The Old Man, and have followed him along on a few more. This one is one of my favorites. You immediately like Sid and Ronnie Abel, the investigators, and you are drawn into liking their adversaries Ed and Nicole Hoyt in spite of the latter being pretty much heartless assassins. You assume this is your standard morality play, but Mr. Perry has a different idea in mind.
One thing I like about Perry is that his characters are not plastic and interchangeable. Many authors simply use the same stick figures and put different names on them (here inner the name of any historical fiction or Harebrained Romance novel). Mr. Perry puts a lot of thought into who these folks are before he writes about him. It's this meticulousness that shows in his story.
Having seen that Mr. Perry has created a few series characters, I was hoping to see another one in his list where Sid and Ronnie or Ed and Nicole came back for an encore. I hope he considers doing this. This was a very enjoyable book, and the narration was also very good.
This is one of those that you'll want to listen to all the way through, and then listen to a second time to appreciate the author's command of the environment and his voice.

Read More Hide me

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-15-16

Re-runs

What disappointed you about Hazardous Duty?

Have you ever watched an episode of NCIS where half the episode is a recap of events that occurred previously in prior seasons, and the story winds up being nothing more than an alternate ending to prior episodes. Makes you feel like you were conned into watching a show, right? Well, this is the trick that the WEB boys play here. We're treated to all the exploits of Charlie and the band from prior episodes, but we get nothing in terms of new story line. I was not amused.

What could W.E.B. Griffin and William E. Butterworth have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

A new book requires a new plot, a new central problem, and a resolution. Although teased with a new problem (Somali pirates, Mexican drug lords, etc.) we never actually see Charlie and the gang engage these problems. Most of the book is one spook pounding the other spooks on the back, while a crazy president and his looney-tunes mother-in-law parade around as comic relief. I kept thinking, surely this is going to get good. It never did.

What does Dick Hill bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Dick must have been as put off as everyone who read the book, because even his accents, which are normally pretty good, faltered. His Alabama accent really was off (I live in Alabama, I know accents). But, give the guy a break. He could not make a silk purse out of a sows ear.

You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

The resolution, such as it was, was clever, I will give you that. But generally speaking, the book left a whole lot to be desired.

Any additional comments?

Rather than read this book, just go back and read all the others. Then skip to the last two chapters of this book, and you'll be in just about the right place.

Read More Hide me

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-15-16

A WWII Pacific Tale

Would you listen to Lucky 666 again? Why?

I will listen to this book again, mostly because it's narration of the aerial battles fought in the South Pacific is riveting. This is an excellent book to help understand what our underfunded and under equipped Pacific Forces faced during WWII.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Jay Zeamer, the pilot, was the most exciting character, although his bombardier was not far behind him. Learning his backstory made his accomplishments during WWII all the more heroic.

What about Jeremy Bobb’s performance did you like?

The narrator did a good job of capturing the excitement of the aerial gun battles as well as the pain of losing friends and fellow airmen.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

The book both made me laugh and cry. There are moments when you realize that all that stood between the United States and tyranny were a few brave men willing to go up in broken-down bombers and take the fight to an enemy that was better equipped, better trained and motivated by a blind allegiance to a man they thought of as God. That we prevailed is a tribute to those fine airmen

Any additional comments?

If you have never worn the uniform, if you have never endured shared sacrifice, and experienced the espirit de corps that comes from military service, this is probably going to be an interesting yarn. But if you have lost friends, suffered at the hands of nature or this country's enemies, and otherwise experienced the life of a soldier, sailor, airman or marine, then you will find in this book the story of your brothers in arms, brave men who went up in cobbled-together aircraft, with barely enough training, and with little more than instinct to guide them, and defeated an enemy that demanded its soldiers fight to the death or be dishonored. You will feel a kinship with these men, and you will pass this book along to your sons and daughters so that they may know from whence this nation derived its statement that "freedom is not free."

Read More Hide me

9 of 12 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-15-16

You will love Pappy's story

Would you consider the audio edition of Indestructible to be better than the print version?

While the audio does not have the maps and other information, the story comes through loud and clear.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Pappy Gunn dominated the story, as he should. It is his story. His feats of daring and airmanship are documented well in the story, and the author freely admits that what is myth and legend may be hard to separate from fact. But the story is simply riveting.

What does Brian Troxell bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Brian was able to read the book without choking up, which I would have had trouble with. I had to dry my eyes more than once learning about the depredations that the Gunn family suffered in Santo Thomas. Having attended high school in the Philippines the setting was far more real to me than perhaps it would have been to other readers. Brian made the story come alive.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

I had to ration this book, a few chapters every day, because otherwise I would have not gotten any work done over the week it took me to listen to the book. Bruning has done an exceptional job with this story, and I will be looking for other books from him because he is a master storyteller.

Any additional comments?

The best reason to get this book is to experience through the eyes of the author what real dedication and suffering look like. A man's allegiance to his orders at the cost of his own family, a family's willingness to hang together through an internment that cost them 40% of their body weight. It is good that the Battle of the Bismarck Sea comes earlier in the book than the full descriptions of the conditions at Santo Thomas. This book left me amazed that Japan could be forgiven after what it did to the innocents.

Read More Hide me

15 of 15 people found this review helpful