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Paul Mullen

Waukesha, WI
  • 36
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  • 259
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4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-23-10

Don't understand the complaints about the narrator

I don't understand the complaints others have posted about the narrator and the production. The narrator is fabulous and his diction and rhythm are perfect for the story.

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1 of 2 people found this review helpful

1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-04-09

Self absorbed wanderings

I just finished "The Namesake", just barely making my way through its rather depressing lack of a story line. I read the wonderful reviews of "Netherland" thinking that this would be different. In fact, it is same thing. I couldn't make it through. I usually finish books as a matter of principle, in case I was missing something, but after 8 hours, I couldn't go on.

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3 of 7 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-28-08

Good Leadership Lessons

Another reviewer commented that this story was the Apollo 13 of its time. That is a perfect description. Beyond that, there are lots of leadership lessons one can take from "watching" Ernest Shackleton lead a group through a prolonged and difficult time. As the story is told, he maintained leadership and vision in extraordinary times.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-23-08

A collection of essays

Less a lecture as much as a collection of essays. They're all worth the time, but none of them are "wow, I never thought of that" kinds of concepts.

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1 of 5 people found this review helpful

3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-19-08

typical spythriller

Typical spythriller. Fun read, but not much to chew on after you're done.

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0 of 4 people found this review helpful

2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-16-08

some things to learn, but...

Well, I'm pretty sure that this is the kind of book, when turned into a movie, will result me falling asleep on the couch. It is all about relationships and culture of an American-born Indian who lives between the eastern India Bengali heritage of his parents and the Americo-European heritage of the US eastern seaboard. The story doesn't really end, the author just stops telling it. I think I learned a few things about being a 3rd culture kid, but there are more efficient ways to learn. This one doesn't go on my recommendations list.

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1 of 7 people found this review helpful

3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-26-08

Starts as an apologetic, ends as story telling

The concept of hints of heaven in our daily life is the central concept of this book and the argument is well made. I have only two critiques:

1) The point is well made in a chapter or two, and the rest of the book seems to be story telling to make the concept book-length rather than simply settling the matter.

2) The narrator with only a few exceptions has a pleasing tone and rhythm, but he has an irritating pattern of modulating his voice when quoting others. The modified tone sounds silly in comparison.

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1 of 2 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-16-08

Long but wonderfully woven together

If you like a quick book, you won't like this one. That is usually my style, but this book is so wonderfully woven together that I fell in love with the protagonists and became vicariously involved in their lives. Among the best fiction I've read this year.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-24-08

Eye Opening... Difficult Listen... Honest

Other reviews have called this a long-winded whining. I didn't see it that way. Irene Spencer sprinkles humor in with tragedy. Her account reveals her own weakness as much as the weakness of those she lived with. She is both angry and empathetic. There is a sense of settled understanding even in the midst of chaos.

I wouldn't recommend this as entertainment, but it was a fascinating insight into fundamentalist Mormon poligamy. It teaches broader themes as it recounts the story of one woman.

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16 of 16 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-05-08

Not your typical biography

Most biographies try to be comprehensive, this one is different. Instead of focusing on every detail of Lincoln's life, it focuses on his political life and the decisions he made that shaped that life.

We desperately need "Lincoln-esk" thinking today. Where our modern society deals with conflict through either conflict or avoidance, Lincoln shows another path.

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2 of 4 people found this review helpful