The Triangle Fire, Protocols of Peace, and Industrial Democracy in Progressive Era New York

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2 out of 5 stars
By Dan on 09-24-15

Almost painful to listen to

What would have made The Triangle Fire, Protocols of Peace, and Industrial Democracy in Progressive Era New York better?

1. Substance - The author's source material clearly drives the narrative here, such that he almost never comes up for air to give us a sense of the bigger picture. Giant sections of the book read like minutes of meetings, with names and positions and organizations (easily forgotten) that lack analysis or argument that might give them a framework.

2. Narrator. Seriously terrible, almost funny reader. Dull and pedantic.

What was most disappointing about Richard Greenwald’s story?

There is this great potential in the beginning, where Greenwald lays out the garment industry , the system of sweating labor, some of the details of exploitation in the factory that give a glimmer of vitality... and then we disappear into long, boring chapters on who led which organization, names and dates and such that are a stereotype of history as mere facts, rather than a discipline that makes and substantiates arguments, illustrates scenes, and analyses facts with engaging scrutiny.

Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Tom Kruse?

Almost anyone else.

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